Health Communities – H Fan http://h-fan.net/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 08:56:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://h-fan.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2-150x150.png Health Communities – H Fan http://h-fan.net/ 32 32 Legislature Corner: Plaskett applauds passage of bipartisan Safer Communities Act to address gun violence https://h-fan.net/legislature-corner-plaskett-applauds-passage-of-bipartisan-safer-communities-act-to-address-gun-violence/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 08:56:12 +0000 https://h-fan.net/legislature-corner-plaskett-applauds-passage-of-bipartisan-safer-communities-act-to-address-gun-violence/ United States Capitol (public domain image) Congresswoman Stacey Plaskett (VI), a member of the House Ways and Means Committees, released the following statement: “I am pleased that the House has successfully passed the bipartisan Safer Communities Act. As the most significant gun legislation in 30 years, this legislation is truly historic. This common-sense, bipartisan bill […]]]>
United States Capitol (public domain image)

Congresswoman Stacey Plaskett (VI), a member of the House Ways and Means Committees, released the following statement:

“I am pleased that the House has successfully passed the bipartisan Safer Communities Act. As the most significant gun legislation in 30 years, this legislation is truly historic. This common-sense, bipartisan bill will protect America’s children, keep our schools safe, and reduce the threat of violence in our country. Additionally, this legislation has a particular impact on the Virgin Islands where we have the second highest rate of firearms being smuggled across our borders and a homicide rate nine times that of the 50 states.

“Concretely, the invoice includes:

Protections for victims of domestic violence: Closing the “boyfriend loophole” by adding convicted abusers to the national instant criminal background check system.

Support for State Crisis Response Orders: Urge states to implement extreme risk protection order laws to keep guns out of reach of people who pose a danger to them themselves or for others.

Crack Down on Gun Trafficking and Purchasing Straw: Prevent dangerous individuals from illegally evading background checks by establishing new federal criminal offenses that cover the purchase and trafficking of straw.

Community-Based Anti-Violence Initiatives: $250 million in funding for community-based violence prevention initiatives.

Child and Family Mental Health Services: Improving access to mental health services for children, youth, and families through Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), and other programs.

Investments in Safe Schools: Expand mental health and support services in schools, including early identification and intervention programs.

“These measures will save lives and are a tremendous step forward in the fight against armed violence.

“The recent horrific mass shootings in Uvalde, Texas, and Buffalo, New York, are stark reminders of the horrors of gun violence in our country. In 2020, 45,222 Americans died from gun-related injuries, more than any other year on record. This represents a 43% increase since 2010. Communities across the country have been torn apart by nearly 300 mass shootings since 2009 – attacks that have killed more than 1,500 people and injured 1,000 others. Firearms are the leading cause of death among children and adolescents in this country.

“The bipartisan Safer Communities Act is the first necessary step in addressing this epidemic of gun violence and making our children, our schools, our communities and our country safer. However, this is only the first step. House Democrats remain committed to fighting for additional gun safety legislation and finally ending the daily rhythm of gun violence in our country.

Click on here to see more details on S. 2938.

Printable, PDF and email version
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New Policy and Advocacy Sub-Committee Aims to Improve Health Outcomes for the General Mass Community https://h-fan.net/new-policy-and-advocacy-sub-committee-aims-to-improve-health-outcomes-for-the-general-mass-community/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 17:30:50 +0000 https://h-fan.net/new-policy-and-advocacy-sub-committee-aims-to-improve-health-outcomes-for-the-general-mass-community/ The MGH has always welcomed people who want to make a difference in their community – within the hospital and beyond. Now, staff take their advocacy to the state and federal levels through the new Executive Committee on Community Health (ECOCH) and the Executive Committee on Diversity and Equity (ECODE) Policy and Advocacy Subcommittee. Committed […]]]>

The MGH has always welcomed people who want to make a difference in their community – within the hospital and beyond. Now, staff take their advocacy to the state and federal levels through the new Executive Committee on Community Health (ECOCH) and the Executive Committee on Diversity and Equity (ECODE) Policy and Advocacy Subcommittee.

Committed to evaluating, approving, and elevating policies that improve public and community health, health equity, and the social determinants of health, the Policy and Advocacy Subcommittee gives MGHers the opportunity to seek approval for legislation at the hospital and/or system level through a online submission process.

“We had a number of policies approved by Mass Gen. Brigham, says Fiona Danaher, MD, co-chair of the subcommittee.

More recently, the system approved the Work and Family Mobility Act, which grants driver’s licenses to Massachusetts residents regardless of immigration status. The law recently became state law after the House and Senate overruled the governor’s veto.

“We know from our social determinants of health data that transportation is a significant barrier for many of our patients with limited English proficiency,” says Danaher. “They have trouble getting to their appointments. Access to vaccines and testing sites has also been difficult for them during the COVID-19 pandemic, so we were thrilled when Mass Gen. Brigham supported this bill.

Staff from all departments are encouraged to submit draft bills for review to the ECOCH/ECODE Policy and Advocacy Sub-Committee. The group amendment request is available here. Submitters are encouraged to describe how the issue affects the health of patients in the MGH community.

Although the app asks for a lot of information, Danaher says staff shouldn’t be intimidated. Subcommittee members are available to answer questions and guide people through the process.

“The work of this joint committee is a great way for MGHers to lend their voices and advocate for state and federal policies that put the health-related needs of our patients first,” says Wendy Macias Konstantopoulos, MD, co-chair of the sub-committee. “Their advocacy will help improve health outcomes in the diverse communities we serve. »

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Shaheen’s statement on the coming into force of the bipartisan Safer Communities Act https://h-fan.net/shaheens-statement-on-the-coming-into-force-of-the-bipartisan-safer-communities-act/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 17:08:30 +0000 https://h-fan.net/shaheens-statement-on-the-coming-into-force-of-the-bipartisan-safer-communities-act/ June 25, 2022 (Washington, DC) – US Senator Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH) issued the following statement after President Biden signed the Bipartisan Safer Communities Act in the law. This key legislation supported by Senator Shaheen and passed by the Senate last week will reduce the threat of gun violence and keep communities safe. “Uvalde. Buffalo. Newton. […]]]>

June 25, 2022

(Washington, DC) – US Senator Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH) issued the following statement after President Biden signed the Bipartisan Safer Communities Act in the law. This key legislation supported by Senator Shaheen and passed by the Senate last week will reduce the threat of gun violence and keep communities safe.

“Uvalde. Buffalo. Newton. Charleston. Las Vegas. These tragic mass killings are embedded in our national consciousness, and the trauma will be felt for generations to come. Action to help affected communities start the healing process is long overdue, and finally Congress has taken an important first step in passing meaningful gun reform legislation.With the President’s signature today, we now have the most comprehensive gun reform law ever. important for nearly three decades, said Shaheen. “This law represents significant progress in keeping guns out of the wrong hands – including criminals and those who pose a danger to themselves and others – as well as expanding access to essential firearms services. Mental Health. The bipartisan consensus around this legislation is unprecedented, but let’s be clear: More action is undeniably needed to end mass gun violence. Our fight for stronger gun safety protections for Americans continues, but today I am proud to have helped bring this legislation across the finish line.

The Bipartisan Safer Communities Act will be:

  • Build support for state crisis response orders by helping states implement red flag laws, ensuring lethal weapons do not fall into the hands of individuals the State considers a danger to themselves or others
  • Improving protections for victims of domestic violence by removing the boyfriend loophole, which would ensure that the current gun possession ban for those convicted of domestic violence offenses applies to serious romantic partners
  • Improve the review process for arms purchases made by those under 21, including by

    • Expanded background check process for buyers under 21
    • Require NICS to contact states for juvenile criminal history and mental health adjudication records
    • Clarify when a person is “engaged in the business” of selling firearms so that they must complete background checks before the sale
    • Increase penalties for illegal straw purchases
    • Crack down on gun trafficking by creating an explicit federal ban on transporting or shipping firearms if there are reasonable grounds to believe the recipient cannot have them
    • Expand Byrne grants to allow states to use these grants to implement state crisis response programs, such as mental health, drug, and/or veterans courts and laws on extreme risk protection orders that include due process protections; and more.

An invoice page is available here. The full text of the bill is available here.

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Fort Worth Age-Friendly & Dementia-Friendly – Welcome to the city of Fort Worth https://h-fan.net/fort-worth-age-friendly-dementia-friendly-welcome-to-the-city-of-fort-worth/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 04:23:19 +0000 https://h-fan.net/fort-worth-age-friendly-dementia-friendly-welcome-to-the-city-of-fort-worth/ * Companies represented certified suitable for seniors or people with dementia. 2-1-1 Texas 2-1-1 is a free, 24/7, confidential service that helps people across the United States find the local resources they need. 60+ Sixty and Better empowers seniors to live with purpose, independence and dignity. The Territorial Agency on Aging (AAA) The Tarrant County […]]]>

* Companies represented certified suitable for seniors or people with dementia.

2-1-1 Texas

2-1-1 is a free, 24/7, confidential service that helps people across the United States find the local resources they need.

60+

Sixty and Better empowers seniors to live with purpose, independence and dignity.

The Territorial Agency on Aging (AAA)

The Tarrant County AAA offers counseling services, caregiver services, a long-term care mediator, and nutrition programs.

*AARP Fort Worth

AARP Texas has offices throughout the state, including Dallas/Fort Worth. Visit to see AARP news, information, events and resources.

Aging and Disability Resource Center (ADRC)

Tarrant County ADRC serves people over the age of 60 or with disabilities, and their caregivers, connecting them to the services and supports they need.

*Alzheimer Association

Find news, research, help and support for everyone affected by Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.

Free training on Alzheimer’s disease available here.

Blue Zones Project

Blue Zones Project® seeks to make Fort Worth healthier. Access information, resources, activities and events.

Catholic Charities Fort Worth (CCFW)

In addition to poverty alleviation, CCFW provides transportation services, dental care, employment, and visits to public utility offices.

Coalition for LGBT Aging (CfA)

CfA focuses on health care, housing, social services, social engagement, advocacy, and education to improve and protect the quality of life for older LGBT adults in North Texas.

*Dementia Friendly Fort Worth

Dementia Friendly Fort Worth is a dementia awareness and education initiative for all sectors of the community.

*Guardianship Services, Inc.

Guardianship is a legal process for appointing a substitute decision maker for people with severe memory loss, dementia, and cognitive impairment that compromises their health and well-being.

*James L. West

Creates and customizes care plans supervised by a board-certified hospice and hospice physician with high frequency of visits from multiple providers.

*JPS Health Network

JPS offers several geriatric services to keep aging adults healthy, including: outpatient services, home visits, professional consultations, long-term care, and the Hospital Elder Life program.

Metro Trinity ACCESS Paratransit

Trinity Metro ACCESS Paratransit Services, formerly known as MITS, provides door-to-door transportation within the service areas of Fort Worth, Blue Mound and River Oaks.

My Journey to North Texas

My Ride North Texas seeks to provide a one-stop transportation resource, where anyone can find a ride in the 16-county region of North Central Texas.

Tarrant Area Gerontological Society (TAGS)

TAGS advocates meeting the needs of older adults and sharing knowledge and information with the community to ensure Tarrant County remains age-friendly.

Tarrant cares

Tarrant Cares provides seniors and adults with disabilities with information and resources including: caregiver support, Alzheimer’s/dementia, falls prevention, abuse prevention, and health insurance.

Tarrant County Public Health

The Tarrant County Public Health Department offers information and resources on a variety of public health issues including: immunizations, flu shots, and chronic disease prevention.

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Building back better to boost childhood immunizations, amid severe drought – Somalia https://h-fan.net/building-back-better-to-boost-childhood-immunizations-amid-severe-drought-somalia/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 13:50:16 +0000 https://h-fan.net/building-back-better-to-boost-childhood-immunizations-amid-severe-drought-somalia/ June 20, 2022 — The promise of primary health care, and one of the main premises of universal health coverage, is to promote good health for everyone, everywhere, including during serious health emergencies. In Somalia, the World Health Organization (WHO) is leveraging its response to the current drought, the worst of its kind in 4 […]]]>

June 20, 2022 — The promise of primary health care, and one of the main premises of universal health coverage, is to promote good health for everyone, everywhere, including during serious health emergencies. In Somalia, the World Health Organization (WHO) is leveraging its response to the current drought, the worst of its kind in 4 decades, to build back better. This means building more efficient health systems that reach more and more people equitably, delivering services in a timely manner without imposing new financial hardship on anyone.

Establishment of outreach vaccination sites to access communities in need

After noting the limited uptake of COVID-19 vaccination in health facilities across the country, WHO, the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and their partners supported ministries of Federal and state health to set up outreach vaccination sites around the country. These sites aim to bring services to people, especially those who do not attend health centers, to accelerate vaccination in order to protect more people against diseases in Somalia.

Building on the success of this intervention, WHO supported the same strategy to immunize children against common childhood diseases and women of childbearing age against tetanus. Children receive vaccines to protect them from childhood tuberculosis; diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis (DTP); polio; Hepatitis B; Haemophilus influenzae B-type; and measles. In addition, the outreach teams provide vitamin A, oral rehydration salts, tetanus vaccination and consultations with the necessary medicines to the communities.

Children who have never been vaccinated before benefit

Since the onset of the drought last year, through 239 sensitization sessions held per week in 35 districts, more than 11,000 children suffering from diarrheal diseases have been treated with oral rehydration salts and zinc.

Consultations in local services have benefited 39,412 people aged over 5 and 38,068 children under 5 to date. More than 29,000 zero-dose children have been identified and received their first vaccinations, and more than 52,000 children have been vaccinated against measles through these outreach services offered to marginalized communities and those living in hard-to-reach areas. ‘access.

As the COVID-19 pandemic has already had a negative effect on routine childhood immunization, the integrated awareness sessions have significantly boosted immunity in children who otherwise would have missed the chance to be protected from disease. By reaching out to communities, including the most vulnerable during the ongoing drought, Somalia is taking steady action to deliver on its promise to deliver essential health services to all.

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$1 million raised to fund a community mental health initiative https://h-fan.net/1-million-raised-to-fund-a-community-mental-health-initiative/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 21:20:00 +0000 https://h-fan.net/1-million-raised-to-fund-a-community-mental-health-initiative/ BATON ROUGE, La. (WAFB) – East Baton Rouge Parish will receive $1 million from Congress to establish a network of mental and behavioral health resource centers through the BRIGHT initiative. Mayor-President Sharon Weston Broome and Congressman Troy A. Carter Sr. announced the news on Saturday, June 18. According to the two leaders, these resource centers […]]]>

BATON ROUGE, La. (WAFB) – East Baton Rouge Parish will receive $1 million from Congress to establish a network of mental and behavioral health resource centers through the BRIGHT initiative.

Mayor-President Sharon Weston Broome and Congressman Troy A. Carter Sr. announced the news on Saturday, June 18. According to the two leaders, these resource centers will provide traditional clinical services by licensed practitioners for communities in dire need of trauma-informed and factor-based care. such as crime, substance abuse, housing insecurity and violence.

“Increasing access to mental health and trauma resources for families in East Baton Rouge is essential to supporting a safe, hopeful and healthy community,” said Mayor Broome. “MP Carter is a wonderful partner, helping to bring these resources to the neighborhoods that need them most, improving public safety and quality of life.”

Congressman Carter emphasized that mental health care is health care.

“We need to take care of our body, mind, and spirit to build a happy, fulfilling life and a strong, safe community. That’s why today I’m so proud to announce that I’ve secured $1 million in community project funding for mental health services in Baton Rouge through the BRIGHT initiative,” Carter said.

“We all deserve to feel safe in our communities and with ourselves. Addressing the mental health needs of our community – as well as the physical health needs – is one way to achieve a stronger, safer Baton Rouge. Thank you to Mayor-President Broome and the City of Baton Rouge for their continued partnership and dedication to this important issue,” Carter added.

According to officials, this community project was funded through the annual Congressional appropriations process and was selected and championed by Congressman Carter after extensive outreach to local groups and stakeholders. It’s one of nine projects, totaling $31.5 million, the congressman has secured for Louisiana’s second congressional district.

Click here to report a typo.

Copyright 2022 WAFB. All rights reserved.

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How environmental and climate injustice affects the LGBTQI+ community https://h-fan.net/how-environmental-and-climate-injustice-affects-the-lgbtqi-community/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 13:04:08 +0000 https://h-fan.net/how-environmental-and-climate-injustice-affects-the-lgbtqi-community/ Fifty-three years ago this month, members of the LGBTQI+ community, many of whom were people of color, stood up to a sectarian police force raiding the Stonewall Inn, a New York City gay bar. This momentous event helped launch the LGBTQI+ rights movement which saw the decriminalization of homosexualitythe legalization of gay marriageand protection against […]]]>

Fifty-three years ago this month, members of the LGBTQI+ community, many of whom were people of color, stood up to a sectarian police force raiding the Stonewall Inn, a New York City gay bar. This momentous event helped launch the LGBTQI+ rights movement which saw the decriminalization of homosexualitythe legalization of gay marriageand protection against discrimination in the workplace. The decade of the Stonewall Riots also saw key moments in the fight for environmental protection, such as the passage of the National Environmental Policy Act and the Clean Air Actas well as in the fight for racial equality, such as the adoption of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Civil Rights Act of 1968.

While the environmental legislation of the 1960s and 1970s was historic, it did not go far enough in protecting everyone from environmental pollution. In response to this clear need for stronger climate solutions, the movement for environmental justice grew out of the civil rights movement, promoting the idea that “all people and communities have the right to breathe clean air, to live free from dangerous levels of toxic pollution, to access healthy food and to share in the benefits of a clean, prosperous economy and dynamic”. Led by Black, Indigenous, and other people of color, the environmental justice movement has since made significant strides in bringing racial and economic justice to the forefront of modern environmentalism and crisis relief. climatic. And as these movements evolve over time, they have become increasingly intersectional in the issues they address. For example, in 2019, environmental justice leaders co-authored and launched with national environmental organizations the National Fair and Just Climate Platform— the first national climate program focused on promoting racial, economic, environmental and climate justice.

Whereas race is the the biggest determining of environmental injustice, environmental justice must be seen through the lens of the most marginalized communities, in particular multiple socio-economic stressors and unequal environmental loads that these communities experience. Environmental injustice disproportionately affects women, low-income communitiesand LGBTQ+ people; moreover, people who share more than one of these identities may be disproportionately affected even more. To help paint a more holistic picture of environmental justice, this column explores the harmful effects of environmental injustice on LGBTQI+ populations in particular.

LGBTQ+ people have long suffered a disproportionate pollution burden compared to heterosexual cisgender people.

Exposure to pollution and environmental hazards

A key pillar of environmental justice is the ability to live without toxic pollution in the air, water and land. LGBTQ+ people have long been matter to a disproportionate pollution burden compared to cisgender heterosexuals – due to discriminatory practices housing policiesHeteronormative NIMBYism”, or the exclusion of LGBTQ+ spaces in certain communities, and higher poverty rates. Studies have found that areas with higher proportions of same-sex couples saw increased amounts of hazardous air pollutants compared to areas with lower proportions of same-sex couples. This has resulted in suffering for LGBTQ+ people higher rates chronic diseases associated with environmental exposure, such as respiratory diseases, cardiovascular diseases and cancer.

Although there is little data on this topic, LGBTQI+ people are also likely to be disproportionately exposed to indoor environmental riskssuch as lead paint, lead pipes, asbestos, radon and other pollutants, due to the many housing challenges faced by these communities; these risks are extremely frequent in substandard housing. LGBTQI+ people are also After at risk exposure to second-hand smoke; smoking rates are higher among these populations, creating higher secondary exposure where they live, work and socialize. This exposure can exacerbate the respiratory stress that LGBTQI+ populations may experience from air pollution and chest bindingwhich is a common practice among transgender men to achieve a flat chest.

Among young adults aged 18-25, LGBT people have a 2.2 times higher risk of homelessness than non-LGBT people.

Vulnerability to extreme weather conditions

The climate crisis, from destructive hurricanes at extreme heat wavesalready disproportionately affects vulnerable communities, especially without housing. Studies found that between 20% and 45% of homeless youth identify as LGBTQ, at least two to four times higher than the estimated percentage of all youth who identify as LGBTQ. And among young adults between the ages of 18 and 25, LGBT people have a 2.2 times higher risk of being homeless than non-LGBT people. transgender people are particularly more likely to be homeless due to discrimination in the spaces of the refuge. When disaster strikes, these already vulnerable populations become at risk of hypothermia, hyperthermia, respiratory distress from wildfire smoke, and infectious disease from flooding, among other conditions.

In the event of a disaster response by local, state, or federal government, LGBTQI+ people may face discrimination in the distribution of aid. A study found that the lack of legal recognition of LGBTQI+ families by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), which is expected to play a greater role in responding to extreme weather emergencies and disasters as the climate crisis deepens, led to an unequal distribution of resources following Hurricane Katrina. FEMA also has a self-confessed the story discrimination against low-income communities and people of color, potentially compounding the effects on intersectional LGBTQI+ communities. Whereas Section 308 of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act prohibits discrimination based on race, gender, disability, and economic status in disaster assistance, it does not protect against discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity.

LGBTQI+ populations are also at higher risk for certain medical conditions that can worsen the health effects of environmental pollution.

Health and healthcare

LGBTQI+ populations are also at higher risk for certain medical conditions that can worsen the health effects of environmental pollution. For example, gay and bisexual cisgender men and transgender people are more likely develop HIV, and studies have shown that exposure to particles with a diameter of 10 micrometers or less (PM10), nitrogen dioxide and ozone – all hazardous air pollutants – are associated with an increased risk of hospitalization for pneumocystis pneumonia in people with HIV. Similarly, LGBTQ+ people experience upper rates of mental health problems, often due to stressful experiences linked to stigma, prejudice and discrimination; studies have shown that these conditions, such as depression and anxiety, can exacerbate the effects of air pollution. It also puts LGBTQI+ populations at risk during and after climate disasters, when the stress of rebuilding, displacement, and the loss of loved ones and communities takes a toll on mental health.

Learn more about LGBTQ people’s experiences of discrimination

When accessing medical care, LGBTQI+ people often face discrimination and/or harassment or barriers to paying for services. A 2020 KAP survey found that 37% of gay, lesbian, queer or bisexual people and 59% of transgender people had experienced discrimination from a health care provider or doctor in the course of their life. ‘last year. It also found that about 3 in 10 LGBTQ Americans faced difficulty in the past year accessing needed medical care due to cost concerns, including more than half of transgender Americans. Another one study found that more than 1 in 6 LGBTQ people avoided seeking health care for fear of discrimination. Such discrimination increases the likelihood that LGBTQI+ people will receive little or no treatment for health problems caused by environmental pollution and stressors related to the climate crisis.

Until recently, there was a gap in our understanding of how environmental and climate injustice specifically affects LGBTQI+ people. Adding an LGBTQI+ lens to environmental justice work will ensure that we advocate for clean air, clean water, and a livable climate for every community. It is essential that we continue to listen to the stories of all communities experiencing multiple systems of oppression to truly deliver environmental justice.
Anahí Naranjo, Communications Manager, Center for Earth, Energy and Democracy (CEED), email to author

Conclusion

The fight for climate and environmental justice is inextricably linked to the fight for racial justice, economic justice, women’s justice, health justice and LGBTQI+ justice. To address these deepening crises, policymakers must begin to see them as interconnected and interdependent. As the nation celebrates Pride Month and the progress of LGBTQI+ rights, it must also commit to creating a just climate and environment for all.

The author wishes to thank Caroline Medina, Lindsay Mahowald, Cathleen Kelly, Justin Dorazio, Shannon Baker-Branstetter, Hannah Malus and Shanée Simhoni from the Center for American Progress and Sofia Sainz, Anahí Naranjo and Ansha Zaman from the Center for Earth, Energy and Democracy (CEED) for their valuable contributions to this column.

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Black communities facing deteriorating health care, report says https://h-fan.net/black-communities-facing-deteriorating-health-care-report-says/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 05:56:08 +0000 https://h-fan.net/black-communities-facing-deteriorating-health-care-report-says/ A NEW report has called for action to address the health inequities faced by black communities in Africa and the Caribbean. A joint research project by Lewisham and Birmingham City Councils has unveiled 39 opportunities for action to help African and Caribbean communities tackle disparities in NHS care and since the Covid-19 pandemic had a […]]]>

A NEW report has called for action to address the health inequities faced by black communities in Africa and the Caribbean.

A joint research project by Lewisham and Birmingham City Councils has unveiled 39 opportunities for action to help African and Caribbean communities tackle disparities in NHS care and since the Covid-19 pandemic had a disproportionate impact on people from black and minority backgrounds.

The Birmingham and Lewisham African Caribbean Health Inequalities Review (BLACHIR) has been hailed as a “landmark” report that used data, expert knowledge and the lived experiences of black people in both regions to contribute to change.

In the foreword to the report, written by Birmingham’s first black MP Paulette Hamilton and Sydenham MP Chris Bester, they said the recent findings had gone unnoticed for far too long.

“Birmingham and Lewisham are global communities that thrive on the many cultures and communities that make them up, including large, diverse and vibrant Black African and Black Caribbean populations, they wrote.

“For too long, our Black African and Black Caribbean populations have experienced health inequities. These have often been ignored and their voices ignored, with these inequalities often being accepted as fact rather than an unacceptable wrong to be addressed.

“Although it has been difficult, the journey of the last eighteen months has been worth it. It also underscored the critical need for this work, as our Black African and Black Caribbean residents have been disproportionately impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, both directly through infections and deaths, and indirectly. economically and socially.

While the review ‘opened up difficult conversations’, MPs both hailed how the everyday experiences of black people had now come to the fore and were ready to take action to lead to ‘lasting change’.

Birmingham, located in the West Midlands, is home to 8% of England’s African and Caribbean populations.

Lewisham has 23% of African or Black Caribbean people living in the area, according to the Office for National Statistics.

In the report, disparities in quality housing, lack of green spaces, pollution problems, unemployment as well as crime and food and fuel poverty amid the rising cost of living were all recognized as inequalities for black communities in Britain that contribute to struggling health. care.

Black people were found to be more likely to be unemployed than the English average in 2019.

Around 8% of people of black Caribbean and African descent were unemployed, compared to 4% of white Britons.

Nationally, 8% of black households were the ethnic group most likely to have a weekly income below £600.

In seven key themes, the report called for the factors of social life to be tackled head-on, including health behaviors and early intervention, as well as tackling the structural racism that has been recognized as a constant barrier to African and Caribbean communities.

The quality of maternal health care and meeting the needs of aging Black communities are just some of the areas for improvement among the 39 recommendations.

“The review is the first step in a long journey of transformation and resolution. This shines a light on the injustice our Black African and Black Caribbean citizens live with every day, which is detrimental to their health and well-being,” the foreword continues.

“This is the reality for too many citizens who live within our communities. They experience racism and discrimination, ignorance and invisibility within the structural and institutional processes that underpin and perpetuate these inequalities. It is a reality that must change.

“The review sets out clear evidence-based opportunities for action and it is now up to us as leaders to work together through health and wellness councils, new integrated care system partnerships and, above all, with our communities themselves, to move them forward.”

He added, “We are already implementing some of these opportunities for action locally in our regions, through programs such as community champions and pilot programs of culturally competent health and wellness programs, and we began to engage national partners to respond to these opportunities at the national level. We must commit to a better future for our citizens and we must work together to seize all opportunities.

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It takes a village to solve the youth mental health crisis https://h-fan.net/it-takes-a-village-to-solve-the-youth-mental-health-crisis/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 04:01:00 +0000 https://h-fan.net/it-takes-a-village-to-solve-the-youth-mental-health-crisis/ Carolina Serna’s work as Care Coordinator for the Clifford Beers, a behavioral health care provider based in New Haven, places her at the heart of the current mental health crisis for children, adolescents and their families. When Clifford Beers receives referrals for cases, Serna and other care coordinators become the face of the organization, helping […]]]>

Carolina Serna’s work as Care Coordinator for the Clifford Beers, a behavioral health care provider based in New Haven, places her at the heart of the current mental health crisis for children, adolescents and their families. When Clifford Beers receives referrals for cases, Serna and other care coordinators become the face of the organization, helping children and families get the clinical care they need. But Serna and his colleagues do much more than that. In a sense, they are the bridge between struggling families and the rest of society.

Consider one of the many difficult situations Serna handled during the COVID-19 crisis: a young Hispanic mother from New Haven had just lost her job. Her husband is gone. She was pregnant. Her son had behavioral health and disability issues. And she was kicked out of her apartment. The first thing Serna did was find a lawyer for the mother. Then she contacted the school and social service agencies for help. “The mother didn’t know how to connect, so I put the family in touch with the help they needed,” says Serna, who is bilingual.

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Federal grant awarded to help treat hypertension in minority communities – CBS Detroit https://h-fan.net/federal-grant-awarded-to-help-treat-hypertension-in-minority-communities-cbs-detroit/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 21:24:00 +0000 https://h-fan.net/federal-grant-awarded-to-help-treat-hypertension-in-minority-communities-cbs-detroit/ (CBS DETROIT) – Heart disease and stroke are the two leading causes of death for Americans, and high blood pressure may increase the risk of both diseases. That’s according to the Centers for Disease Control, making blood pressure checks a vital step for prevention. READ MORE: Grand Rapids police officer charged with second degree murder […]]]>

(CBS DETROIT) – Heart disease and stroke are the two leading causes of death for Americans, and high blood pressure may increase the risk of both diseases.

That’s according to the Centers for Disease Control, making blood pressure checks a vital step for prevention.

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“People who smoke are going to be at higher risk,” said Dr. Lisa Knysz, director of integration at Central City Integrated Health.

“People who have a family history of high blood pressure. People who have a personal history or family history of diabetes. People who have a diet high in salt and/or fat, obesity, and then a high alcohol consumption.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services partners with the American Heart Association to bring treatment, education, and preventive care to minority communities in and around Detroit.

“They can get dizzy, it can affect their vision, if left untreated, which we’re starting to see if that can lead to other heart disease,” Dr. Knysz said.

“They may even have a stroke and other additional serious conditions.”

Central City Integrated Health received a $98,000 grant to treat hypertension through case management services and self-monitoring blood pressure devices.

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“We teach them how to use it, the blood pressure cuffs we use are actually going to store the different bps right in the cuff itself, so when they come in we plug it into the computer and we can download, said Dr. Knysz.

The devices help track data to create hypertension treatment plans for patients.

“So it’s very important that we want individuals to come even if they don’t have insurance,” Dr. Knysz said.

“Here, coming to Central City Integrated Health, whether you have insurance or you don’t have the ability to pay, we’re not going to turn anyone away. We will provide care and treatment to everyone who walks through the door. »

For more information about the program and enrollment eligibility, call 313-831-3160.

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