Health Communities – H Fan http://h-fan.net/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 02:32:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://h-fan.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2-150x150.png Health Communities – H Fan http://h-fan.net/ 32 32 Rio Tinto commits A$250 million to support communities in Western Australia https://h-fan.net/rio-tinto-commits-a250-million-to-support-communities-in-western-australia/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 02:07:00 +0000 https://h-fan.net/rio-tinto-commits-a250-million-to-support-communities-in-western-australia/ PERTH, Australia–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Rio Tinto is building on more than 50 years of work to help create thriving and resilient communities across Western Australia with a $250 million Australian commitment to the new Community Investment Initiative in state government resources. initiative announcement by the Premier of Western Australia, Mark McGowan, MLA, today provides a platform for […]]]>

PERTH, Australia–()–Rio Tinto is building on more than 50 years of work to help create thriving and resilient communities across Western Australia with a $250 million Australian commitment to the new Community Investment Initiative in state government resources.

initiative announcement by the Premier of Western Australia, Mark McGowan, MLA, today provides a platform for direct contributions from resource companies to the iconic community infrastructure projects that will make Western Australia a even better place to live.

A first pipeline of projects has already been identified. Rio Tinto and the Government of Western Australia will work together to further define the projects that Rio Tinto will help fund over the next 10 years.

This initiative will include projects that contribute to long-term social and economic outcomes in areas such as education and training, health, Indigenous wellness, and energy decarbonization.

Simon Trott, Managing Director of Rio Tinto Iron Ore, said: “This initiative is a great example of government and industry working together to support critical projects that will enable our community to thrive for generations to come.

“We want to leave a lasting and positive legacy wherever we operate, and this initiative will build on our more than 50 years of work to help create thriving and resilient communities across Western Australia.”

An advisory committee, comprised of an independent chair as well as government and industry representatives, will be convened to oversee this exciting initiative.

WA Premier Mark McGowan said: “I applaud Rio Tinto for its contribution and leadership as a founding partner in this important initiative, which will have lasting benefits for generations.

“I look forward to seeing some iconic state projects delivered, with continued support from Rio Tinto.

“With our state’s strong economic position, we are in the perfect position to settle for the long term and make Western Australia an even better place to live.”

For more information, visit WA.gov.au/rcii.

Note to editors:

Through community and social investments, Rio Tinto seeks to produce positive and measurable social results and help communities achieve their goals and aspirations. Our total voluntary global social investments were $72 million, covering health, education, environment, agriculture and business development programs. This is an increase of approximately 53% over 2020 voluntary social investment spending.

Earlier this year Rio Tinto committed 75 million Australian dollars over 10 years to renew its partnerships with Ashburton County and the Town of Karratha to continue to deliver a range of important community projects in both areas.

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Four Mississippi College ‘Citizen Scholars’ honored for giving 600 hours of their time to communities – Reuters https://h-fan.net/four-mississippi-college-citizen-scholars-honored-for-giving-600-hours-of-their-time-to-communities-reuters/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 16:42:52 +0000 https://h-fan.net/four-mississippi-college-citizen-scholars-honored-for-giving-600-hours-of-their-time-to-communities-reuters/ Four Mississippi College Citizen Scholars honored for giving 600 hours of their time to communities Posted at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, November 19, 2022 USM administration building The Center for Community Engagement (CCE) at the University of Southern Mississippi has recognized four recipients of the Citizen Scholar Award, an honor for students who demonstrate significant […]]]>

Four Mississippi College Citizen Scholars honored for giving 600 hours of their time to communities

Posted at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, November 19, 2022

The Center for Community Engagement (CCE) at the University of Southern Mississippi has recognized four recipients of the Citizen Scholar Award, an honor for students who demonstrate significant involvement in community engagement.

The Citizen Scholars program is a new initiative that honors undergraduate students who have made significant contributions to their communities by integrating service and community engagement into their college experience. Students who earn more than 100 hours of service, participate in a community learning experience, and pass an exit interview are eligible to be recognized as Citizen Scholars.

The four winners of this semester are:

  • Carrington Brown, major in kinesiology and minor in psychology from Hattiesburg, Miss
  • Demecia Edmond, social work major from Canton, Miss.
  • Emily Rushing, nursing major of Gloster, Miss.
  • Sarah Mitchell, microbiology major from Brandon, Miss.

“The Citizen Scholars program was developed to recognize students who go above and beyond to serve their community while in college,” said CCE Director Christy Kayser. “These students, in addition to their volunteer work, are also finding a way to integrate community learning into their academic work through internships, leadership projects and research. We are so proud of all they have accomplished.

As students at Southern Miss, the four recipients volunteered a combined total of 615 hours of service, in addition to participating in various community learning experiences.

Brown has completed more than 220 hours of service through volunteer work with West Point Baptist Church, Christian Services and Dance Art Dance. Brown’s community learning experience was as an MS INBRE Outreach Fellow where she participated in a 10-week summer community research on the topics of nutrition, physical activity and health; COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy; and the obesity science and prevention initiative.

Mitchell has completed over 150 hours of service through volunteer work with Forrest General Hospital’s Ambassador Program. Mitchell’s community learning experience was a leadership project called Eggroll Fest through which the Vietnamese Student Association makes eggrolls and sells them to benefit a Collective Philanthropy Project (CPP). This year, the CPP was One Body Village, an art therapy program for child victims of sexual abuse.

Rushing has completed more than 110 hours of service through volunteer work with Forrest General Hospital, Centerville Baptist Church’s pantry and outreach programs, and providing support at COVID vaccination clinics. -19. Rushing’s community learning experience was an internship at Forrest General Hospital where she provided nursing care to patients under the supervision of a registered nurse.

Edmond has completed 135 hours of service volunteering at Jackson-area schools and helping coordinate free big backpacks three years in a row. Edmond’s community learning experience was an externship with Pinebelt Mental Healthcare Resources where she learned about social work and mental health.

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$9.7 million for floods that hit Australian communities https://h-fan.net/9-7-million-for-floods-that-hit-australian-communities/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 01:08:10 +0000 https://h-fan.net/9-7-million-for-floods-that-hit-australian-communities/ Date published: November 16, 2022 Type of support: Press release Spectators: General public As flooding continues to cause significant damage and disruption on the East Coast, the Australian Government is providing an additional $9.7 million to affected communities to bolster mental health supports and respond to public health risks posed by floods. mosquito-borne diseases. More […]]]>

Date published:

November 16, 2022

Type of support:

Press release

Spectators:

General public

As flooding continues to cause significant damage and disruption on the East Coast, the Australian Government is providing an additional $9.7 million to affected communities to bolster mental health supports and respond to public health risks posed by floods. mosquito-borne diseases.

More than 135 local government areas across New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania have suffered flooding in recent months. It has devastated communities, the environment and infrastructure and harmed the mental and physical health of many Australians.

This funding includes:

  • $4 million to help First Nations communities hardest hit by flooding provide much-needed mental health support, including trauma counseling and healing support, provided by local community-controlled organizations ;
  • $1.5 million for Local Wellness and Resilience Grants to help communities recover, which will be deployed by local Primary Health Networks (RPHs);
  • $1.2 million to improve local disaster coordination by HLPs, and;
  • $300,000 to create and translate communication materials for culturally and linguistically diverse communities so they know what help and support is available.

When the immediate danger of flooding has passed, the retained water can pose additional problems for communities, including an increased risk of mosquito-borne diseases.

Avoiding getting bitten is of paramount importance over the next few months to limit the risk of infection from dangerous mosquito-borne diseases that may be present, such as Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) and Murray Valley encephalitis.

Funding was provided to improve awareness of the risk of JEV and other mosquito-borne viruses and how to protect themselves, and to improve future nationwide outbreak preparedness, including:

  • $1.7 million to immediately improve existing communications about the risk of mosquito-borne viruses and the importance of bite avoidance measures to prevent infection, and
  • $1 million to support national coherence of mosquito management and control activities and improve understanding of risk patterns and areas where JEV may be present, which will ensure Australia can respond effectively to future outbreaks, including those caused by natural disasters such as floods.

Contact your local public health authority to find out if you should be vaccinated against JEV.

This program builds on Australian Government funding of $13.1 million announced in August 2022 and $31.2 million in March 2022 to provide mental health support in parts of New South Wales and Queensland hit by flooding earlier this year. This funding also complements state response activities in flood-affected areas.

Anyone in distress can also seek immediate help via Lifeline (13 11 14), Kids Helpline (1800 55 1800) or head to www.headtohealth.gov.au or call Head to Health (1800 595 212).

Quotes attributable to Acting Prime Minister Marles:

“As flood waters continue to rise, it is clear that the impacts of these events will be felt for years to come.

“The Albanian government is committed to providing long-term assistance to these communities, including mental health support.”

Quotes attributable to Minister Butler:

“Mental health is a top priority for the Albanian government, and we know the floods in southeastern Australia are putting enormous pressure on individuals and communities.

“Our funding will help ensure that those affected by the floods can access help and support, and that help is there throughout their recovery.

“We also want Australians living and traveling in flooded areas to understand the risk of mosquito-borne disease, especially as current La Nina conditions are likely to bring continued rains and the ideal conditions for the number of mosquitoes increases dramatically.

Quotes attributable to Minister Watt:

“These floods have been widespread and this aid will go a long way to supporting the mental and physical health of affected communities in New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania.

“Natural disasters and the subsequent recovery process impact people in a variety of ways, and we are committed to ensuring that help is available.

“This support is in addition to the financial support already provided by the Albanian government to help flood-affected areas recover, and we will continue to work with state governments to ensure communities have what they need. “

Quotes attributable to Assistant Minister McBride:

“Cumulative natural disasters like floods are traumatic and have a significant impact on the mental health and well-being of individuals, families and communities.

“That’s why the Albanian government is providing funds to help communities respond to the floods in the way that best meets their needs, whether it’s mental health trainings for community organizations or social events. such as barbecues or community picnics, which help bring people together.

“We want to make sure all Australians have access to the care and support they need, when they need it.”

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Building Better Communities | VIEWS OF NEVADA https://h-fan.net/building-better-communities-views-of-nevada/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://h-fan.net/building-better-communities-views-of-nevada/ Early in his presidency, George Washington believed that the promotion of science and literature was the basis of public happiness and that they were also the very basis of democracy. If Nevada were to use health care as a substitute for science and public education as a substitute for literature, Washington would have reason to […]]]>

Early in his presidency, George Washington believed that the promotion of science and literature was the basis of public happiness and that they were also the very basis of democracy. If Nevada were to use health care as a substitute for science and public education as a substitute for literature, Washington would have reason to worry. Nevada currently ranks in the bottom half of states for health care quality and ranks 45th for public school systems.

Are education and health care linked?

The medical literature is full of studies suggesting strong and consistent relationships between the quality of education and the quality of health. Ultimately, more educated people live longer and are healthier. Why? Education promotes critical thinking skills and social skills that prepare individuals to understand the value of a healthy lifestyle and drive them to achieve it. Data from the National Academy of Medicine shows that less educated adults are more likely to be obese, smoke, use drugs and abstain from exercise.

The “social determinants of health” are the factors in our environment that directly affect health independently of biological determinants such as the immune system, cardiovascular system or digestive system. The social determinants of health include resources in a person’s neighborhood, access to healthy food, access to transportation, financial stability, and of course access to education and health care. health. The social determinants of health contribute to large disparities in health care among people who differ only in the location of their homes.

To best improve the health of all communities, we must address the impacts of social determinants. Education provides a pathway out of poverty and is the most fundamental determinant.

What does this mean for Las Vegas?

Recently, the Clark County School District and UNLV’s Kirk Kerkorian School of Medicine partnered to provide clinical care to elementary school students. Although initially a pilot project, there are plans to add additional schools and for UNLV to provide after-school classes on healthy lifestyles in university schools of education, dentistry, nursing, public health, integrative health and medicine. Such partnerships are natural because healthcare providers are responsible for improving the health of the communities in which they reside.

Education can prevent disease. Knowing what foods to eat, what foods to avoid, knowing preventive health measures such as vaccinations, and understanding the vital role that physical activity contributes to health are simple examples. Education can also lead to a better workforce and more informed citizens, and education can help stabilize the economy by providing a diverse workforce. The combination of education and health care, as in the UNLV/CCSD model, can be expected to produce healthier and more educated citizens. Improving access to health care can reduce disparities and create better communities.

Dr. Marc J. Kahn is Dean of the Kirk Kerkorian School of Medicine and Vice President of Health Affairs at UNLV. Jesus F. Jara is superintendent of the Clark County School District.

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Nursing graduate, community clinic CEO helps shape the health and well-being of local communities https://h-fan.net/nursing-graduate-community-clinic-ceo-helps-shape-the-health-and-well-being-of-local-communities/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 06:09:33 +0000 https://h-fan.net/nursing-graduate-community-clinic-ceo-helps-shape-the-health-and-well-being-of-local-communities/ Shannon Magsam Judd Semingson, Community Clinic CEO Judd Semingson took over as CEO of the community clinic on New Year’s Day 2020. The independent primary healthcare system operated 13 facilities and was suddenly scrambling to help patients amid the deadly COVID-19 pandemic. 19. In addition to patients covering Benton and Washington counties, […]]]>




Shannon Magsam

Judd Semingson, Community Clinic CEO

Judd Semingson took over as CEO of the community clinic on New Year’s Day 2020. The independent primary healthcare system operated 13 facilities and was suddenly scrambling to help patients amid the deadly COVID-19 pandemic. 19.

In addition to patients covering Benton and Washington counties, Semingson had 275 employees in the eye of the storm.

“Admittedly, when I went through the interview process in 2019, I didn’t include a global pandemic in my 100-day plan,” he said. “However, we don’t often have the opportunity to define our battles in advance.”

Those early months set the tone for Semingson’s leadership approach and united his team. They still carry those lessons.

“I am incredibly lucky to be surrounded by a great team. Our defining question was, and still is, how can we adapt to better help those we serve? We continue to have challenges ahead of us, but we have already gone through a period refining the fire and will adjust as needed,” he said.

Semingson, whose healthcare career spans nearly 25 years, is a U of A Eleanor Mann School of Nursing former student. He also holds a master’s degree in nursing from the University of Cincinnati and a master’s degree in business administration with a major in health care administration from Western Governor’s University.

He started out in intensive care at Washington County hospitals, but spent most of his career at Advanced Orthopedic Specialists in Fayetteville. He started out as a nurse in the specialty clinic, but eventually moved into the administrative side as the practice grew. Semingson loved the healthcare industry and decided to go back to school a third time to earn an MBA.

He was introduced to the community clinic while accumulating clinical hours as an advanced practice nursing student. He never forgot his patients or the clinic’s mission, which resonated with him. He stayed connected and applied when the clinic’s associate medical director position became available. He held this position for a year when the CEO of the community clinic announced that she was retiring. After a national search, Semingson was selected.

When the community clinic was established in 1989, volunteer doctors saw patients once a month. This year, the Community Clinic is adding an 18th clinic in Centerton, has over 325 staff and has served approximately 42,000 patients thus far. The clinics provide comprehensive primary, dental, pediatric, behavioral and other health care. They even offer physiotherapy services. The organization’s goal is to make health care accessible to everyone, regardless of their ability to pay. Some patients have insurance, Medicare or Medicaid, while others pay on a sliding scale. Semingson focuses on improving access to primary care, which is essential to overall health. It means reducing barriers. Many of the clinics are based at area schools for convenience. Employees also connect patients with other resources, such as food or transportation.

“Our patients come from all walks of life and walks of life. I love hearing their stories. Some are from around the corner and some are from all over the world,” Semingson said.

He said helping people and creating healthy communities are the most rewarding aspects of a leading community clinic. “Health is a very personal journey, and far too often people have a narrow and fragmented view of what healthcare means,” he said. “We have amazing team members who have a broad view of accessibility, value and service. I constantly hear about the services or relationships our teams have established to help a patient or family in the need. We are the only primary care organization with comprehensive dental operations as part of our system. This broad view of healthcare allows us not only to treat acute or chronic conditions, but also to connect and educating our patients/families on healthy behaviors This work goes towards the prevention of disease or complications of disease.

Semingson wants to continue to expand the clinic’s reach and services.

“Our first goal is to help our team members grow personally and professionally,” he said. “We review and revise operations across our organization to better serve our team. In return, we seek to expand the services provided across our organization. Northwest Arkansas is a region dynamic, diverse and growing, the community clinic has both the responsibility and the opportunity to shape the health and well-being of our communities.”

Several team members are former nurses from the University of Alberta, and the clinics often serve as training grounds for students. Public health majors also work with the team.

Even though he is the CEO, Semingson maintains his nursing skills. He does not want to give up working with patients.

“I initially paused direct patient care to focus my full attention on our organization’s COVID response. However, I will resume in the near future,” he said. “Being a clinician is an essential part of who I am. Being involved in direct care operations also helps me see the challenges or opportunities that our teams face.”


This story is the latest in a series featuring students, faculty and staff in the College of Education and Health Professions that illustrate the core of the college WE CARE Priorities. The college is helping solve complex education and health challenges in Arkansas and beyond through this new initiative. Visit COEHP’s online magazine, the Coworkerfor more news from the six units that make up the college.

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Racial disparities in flu vaccination rates have serious consequences https://h-fan.net/racial-disparities-in-flu-vaccination-rates-have-serious-consequences/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 10:15:06 +0000 https://h-fan.net/racial-disparities-in-flu-vaccination-rates-have-serious-consequences/ For the 2022-2023 flu season, 128.4 million doses of flu vaccine have been distributed in the USA. And while half of American adults get their flu shot each year, a new report from the Centers for Disaster Control and Prevention finds that Black, Hispanic, and Native American/Alaska Native (AI/AN) adults are less likely to get […]]]>
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Envista’s latest Cares Challenge aims to improve community health https://h-fan.net/envistas-latest-cares-challenge-aims-to-improve-community-health/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 21:42:00 +0000 https://h-fan.net/envistas-latest-cares-challenge-aims-to-improve-community-health/ TOPEKA, Kan. (WIBW) – Helping build healthy communities is the goal of this month’s EnvistaCares Challenge partner. Grace Greene with Envista and Megan Skaggs, CEO of HealthAccess, visited Eye on NE Kansas to learn more about their work. Health Access works to improve access to health care, promote health equity, and coordinate volunteer efforts on […]]]>

TOPEKA, Kan. (WIBW) – Helping build healthy communities is the goal of this month’s EnvistaCares Challenge partner.

Grace Greene with Envista and Megan Skaggs, CEO of HealthAccess, visited Eye on NE Kansas to learn more about their work. Health Access works to improve access to health care, promote health equity, and coordinate volunteer efforts on behalf of the Shawnee County medical community. The Collaboratives ultimately provide low-income and uninsured people with help paying for prescriptions and help getting primary care and specialty care.

The EnvistaCares Challenge matches up to $2,500 in donations to Health Access during the month of November. Donation can be made online at www.envistacares.com. Envista will also support Health Access with a media package worth over $12,000 that promotes the group through billboards, email, social media and radio.

“This opportunity gives us much-needed support to continue to coordinate specialist physician referrals and process prescription payments for our patients,” Skaggs said. “The donation matching will have such an impact on our 1,550 patients currently enrolled in HealthAccess.”

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Securing the world’s food supply at the center of the international conference on agriculture – UQ News https://h-fan.net/securing-the-worlds-food-supply-at-the-center-of-the-international-conference-on-agriculture-uq-news/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 20:54:12 +0000 https://h-fan.net/securing-the-worlds-food-supply-at-the-center-of-the-international-conference-on-agriculture-uq-news/ Feeding the world’s growing population amid the ravages of climate change will be the focus of a major agriculture conference which kicks off today in Brisbane. More than 1000 delegates from 53 countries gathered for this year TropAg International Conference being hosted by the University of Queensland. UQ Professor of Protected Crops Paul PG Gauthier […]]]>

Feeding the world’s growing population amid the ravages of climate change will be the focus of a major agriculture conference which kicks off today in Brisbane.

More than 1000 delegates from 53 countries gathered for this year TropAg International Conference being hosted by the University of Queensland.

UQ Professor of Protected Crops Paul PG Gauthier is one of six plenary speakers and will discuss the science of sheltered agriculture as a solution to mitigating the impact of climate change and supply chain disruption.

“Building a sustainable and reliable food production system is one of the greatest challenges facing the world,” said Professor Gauthier.

“Climate change, natural disasters, digital disruption, population growth and the pandemic all reinforce the need for agribusiness innovation in a rapidly changing landscape.”

Professor Gauthier said there were huge opportunities for Australia if, for example, it was able to produce off-season tropical and subtropical crops for the rest of the world.

“It’s really exciting and that’s what sheltered cultivation and vertical farming can deliver,” he said.

“My priority is to empower the next generation of farmers with a focus on tropical and subtropical crops, which is an emerging industry with a high growth rate.”

UQ Professor Henrietta Marrie AM will discuss his work on the development of traditional foods through the ARC Training Center for Unique Australian Foods.

Professor Marrie will tell delegates that while Australia has a growing bush food industry, not enough has been done to attract indigenous peoples to this market.

“In Australia, we need to cherish the indigenous peoples’ knowledge system and work on how to bring their food to the table in a way that exposes the varieties we have in Australia and how it can be part of the diet of everyone,” the professor said. said Mary.

“Traditional Australian foods were expected to be a million dollar market in the 1980s, and while those expectations were exceeded, it was mainly non-Aboriginal people who benefited.

Professor Marrie recently received a Discovery Grant from ARC to study Indigenous ethnobotanical knowledge to help support and promote First Nations economic self-reliance and sustainability.

The packed three-day conference schedule includes 240 presentations on four key themes: agribusiness, value chains and the bioeconomy, predictive farming, sustainable agrifood systems, healthy agriculture and food for healthy communities.

conference chairman and director of the Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation Professor Matthew Morell said TropAg was a rare opportunity to hear from world-class scientists and industry experts.

“What we face is grim, but we have the skills, the technology and the science to face it head on,” Prof Morell said.

“Our scientists are at the forefront of world-changing technologies and making the most of game-changing changes in plant breeding, protected environments, artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning, all of which will be needed to address to the changing world and increasing demand for food.

The University of Queensland hosts TropAg in partnership with the Queensland Government through the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries.

The conference will take place from October 31 to November 2, 2022 at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre.

Images available via drop box

Media: Natalie MacGregor, n.nmacgregor@uq.edu.au; +61 (0)409 135651, Caroline Martin, carolyn.martin@uq.edu.au+61 (0)439 399 886.

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Study Shows Hospitals Contribute to Economic Health of Communities | Company https://h-fan.net/study-shows-hospitals-contribute-to-economic-health-of-communities-company/ Sat, 22 Oct 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://h-fan.net/study-shows-hospitals-contribute-to-economic-health-of-communities-company/ A Harrisburg-based organization recently released the results of a study it conducted on the economic impacts of hospitals on communities in Pennsylvania. And like any crackerjack photographer, Brook Ward anticipated what was to come. “I’m not surprised by the results,” said Ward, who is more commonly recognized as president and CEO of the Washington Health […]]]>

A Harrisburg-based organization recently released the results of a study it conducted on the economic impacts of hospitals on communities in Pennsylvania. And like any crackerjack photographer, Brook Ward anticipated what was to come.

“I’m not surprised by the results,” said Ward, who is more commonly recognized as president and CEO of the Washington Health System. “Because of the importance of health care, the economic impact on our communities is enormous. We are not only taking care to keep the community as healthy as possible, but we are dealing with a significant purely economic impact.

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ACHI Gives Thanks for Extraordinary Efforts and Sacrifices in Pandemic https://h-fan.net/achi-gives-thanks-for-extraordinary-efforts-and-sacrifices-in-pandemic/ Wed, 19 Oct 2022 21:19:10 +0000 https://h-fan.net/achi-gives-thanks-for-extraordinary-efforts-and-sacrifices-in-pandemic/ LITTLE STONE – The Arkansas Center for Health Improvement on Tuesday thanked everyone whose extraordinary efforts and continued sacrifices during the COVID-19 pandemic have had a positive impact on Arkansas families and communities. Expressions of gratitude for pandemic relief efforts dominated this year’s Friends of ACHI appreciation event at the Clinton Presidential Library. The annual […]]]>

LITTLE STONE – The Arkansas Center for Health Improvement on Tuesday thanked everyone whose extraordinary efforts and continued sacrifices during the COVID-19 pandemic have had a positive impact on Arkansas families and communities.

Expressions of gratitude for pandemic relief efforts dominated this year’s Friends of ACHI appreciation event at the Clinton Presidential Library. The annual event featured a spoken word poem reflecting the challenges of recent years, “The Second Mountain”, written for ACHI by nationally acclaimed poet Chris James and performed by the author.

A video of James reading the poem is available at youtube.com/watch?v=uD1ov3Qz_bE.

ACHI President and CEO, Dr. Joe Thompson, expressed his thanks not only to ACHI’s friends and supporters, but to all Arkansans who have risen to the challenges of the pandemic for the greater good. , including healthcare workers, policy makers, school officials, religious leaders and business leaders.

“Thank you for the work you’ve done to bridge the gaps in our communities,” Thompson said. “We have a lot of work to do, but we survived this pandemic together, and I think a lot of the damage that the pandemic could have caused was prevented by the collective network that is represented here and by your networks in your communities. and throughout the state.

The event also included the presentation of the 2022 Dr. Tom Bruce Arkansas Health Impact Awards. This year’s recipients are the late Dr. Betty Ann Lowe, former medical director of Arkansas Children’s Hospital, and Jon Swanson, retired executive director of Metropolitan Emergency Medical Services.

On behalf of the ACHI Health Policy Board, ACHI annually presents the Dr. Tom Bruce Arkansas Health Impact Award to one or more individuals for their outstanding efforts to improve the health of all Arkansas. The award is named after the late Dr. Tom Bruce, dean of the University of Arkansas College of Medicine for a decade and a pioneer in the field of community health.

ACHI is a nonpartisan, independent health policy center that serves as a catalyst for improving the health of all Arkansans through evidence-based research, public issue advocacy, and collaborative program development. More information about the Tom Bruce Award, including a list of past recipients, is available at achi.net/arkansas-health-impact-award.

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