Health Communities – H Fan http://h-fan.net/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 02:19:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://h-fan.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2-150x150.png Health Communities – H Fan http://h-fan.net/ 32 32 COVID-19: Bearskin Lake at ‘tipping point’ amid outbreak https://h-fan.net/covid-19-bearskin-lake-at-tipping-point-amid-outbreak/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 01:44:05 +0000 https://h-fan.net/covid-19-bearskin-lake-at-tipping-point-amid-outbreak/ OTTAWA – The chief of Bearskin Lake said the remote community of northern Ontario is “almost at a breaking point” after half of its population tested positive for COVID-19, as he renewed his call for immediate federal help. Chief Lefty Kamenawatamin joined other indigenous leaders in a press conference on Friday to call on ministers […]]]>

OTTAWA – The chief of Bearskin Lake said the remote community of northern Ontario is “almost at a breaking point” after half of its population tested positive for COVID-19, as he renewed his call for immediate federal help.

Chief Lefty Kamenawatamin joined other indigenous leaders in a press conference on Friday to call on ministers to send emergency aid, including staff, to distribute essential supplies such as food , water and wood for the stoves to keep residents warm in freezing weather.

“We need help now and boots on the pitch,” he said.

The First Nation is in a state of emergency as COVID-19 has infected 201 of its 400 residents, including elders and a nine-month-old baby. The epidemic has meant that much of the community is isolating itself.

There are now only around 30 frontline workers in the community able to provide essential supplies to those forced to self-isolate because they or their family members have tested positive, said Kamenawatamin.

About 80% of the population is vaccinated, but there is a lack of testing kits, places to self-isolate and other crucial resources, the chief said.

A spokesperson for Indigenous Services Minister Patty Hajdu said a request for military aid was received through the province of Ontario on Thursday evening, which the federal government is now urgently considering.

“The federal government is working as quickly as it can to respond to a request for military assistance,” said Andrew MacKendrick.

Charles Fox, former Grand Chief of the Nishnawbe Aski Nation and resident of Bearskin Lake, has warned that COVID-19 is now spreading to other neighboring First Nations communities.

Fox sharply criticized what he called a “disdainful attitude” on the part of federal ministers.

“Because we’re a remote First Nation people don’t care,” he said. “Truth and reconciliation – where are they? “

Fox said if the scale of the outbreak had been in Toronto, there would have been a national outcry.

Frank McKay, chair of the Windigo First Nations Council, a coalition of leaders representing several communities including Bearskin Lake, said the community doctor had predicted that COVID-19 cases would continue to rise.

He said the struggling community now needs urgent mental health support to help them cope with the unprecedented crisis.

McKay criticized the government for taking too long to respond, adding that as Canadian citizens, members of indigenous communities deserve “the same rights as all Canadians.”

“We as remote First Nations are beggars on our own land,” he said.

He said $ 1.1 million in funding had been made available by the federal government, but that would only cover the cost of chartered planes for the remote community served by air.

NDP MP Charlie Angus, who called the press conference, said it “shouldn’t be that difficult for the federal government to send aid.”

“The people of Bearskin Lake are completely overwhelmed by their efforts to provide essentials like firewood to heat homes and groceries to the isolated,” Angus said.

“They desperately need help to get them through the next few days and weeks. The Liberal government must stop dragging its feet and urgently help this community.

Grand Chief Derek Fox of the Nishnawbe Aski Nation said Bearskin Lake has received offers of help, including from other Indigenous groups and doctors. But federal help was needed and they should “cut red tape” and respond, he said.

Ontario Regional Chief Glen Hare praised Kamenawatamin for his leadership during the COVID-19 outbreak and urged the government to immediately deploy the Canadian Armed Forces to help the struggling community.

He said the Armed Forces should remain “on standby” to help other First Nations communities in the weeks and months to come.

Intergovernmental Affairs Minister Dominic LeBlanc told a press conference in Ottawa earlier Friday that the government will do everything in its power to support Indigenous communities, such as Bearskin Lake, facing COVID crises. -19.

LeBlanc said his fellow ministers are in frequent contact with their provincial counterparts to coordinate aid.

Nicolas Moquin, spokesperson for Indigenous Services Canada, said he is working closely with leaders of Bearskin Lake First Nation and other local organizations to support the community.

The department said it had deployed a rapid response team to help, including three registered nurses and a paramedic. Three nurses from other First Nations were also present, along with three people to help community members chop firewood, he added.

Indigenous Services Canada said in December the government approved funding for isolation supplies and additional funding of $ 1.12 million for community needs.

Health Minister Jean-Yves Duclos said Hajdu is in daily contact with leaders of indigenous communities to ensure they have enough rapid tests, tracing support and vaccines.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published on January 7, 2022.


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19 – When will they give me the booster dose if I have passed the coronavirus? – CVBJ https://h-fan.net/19-when-will-they-give-me-the-booster-dose-if-i-have-passed-the-coronavirus-cvbj/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 10:24:29 +0000 https://h-fan.net/19-when-will-they-give-me-the-booster-dose-if-i-have-passed-the-coronavirus-cvbj/ 06/01/2022 at 10:48 am CET Valentina raphio the people already vaccinated against covid-19 they already know when you can get the booster dose in Spain. It will be from the fourth week of your convalescence. The change in protocol was made public by the Ministry of Health in the last update of the document “Vaccination […]]]>

06/01/2022 at 10:48 am CET

Valentina raphio

the people already vaccinated against covid-19 they already know when you can get the booster dose in Spain. It will be from the fourth week of your convalescence. The change in protocol was made public by the Ministry of Health in the last update of the document “Vaccination strategy against covid-19 in Spain”.

This last modification on the delivery of the third doses affects the people under 65 who have already received a complete immunization schedule in the last six months (in the case of Pfizer and Moderna) or in the last three months in the case of Janssen or AstraZeneca) and who became infected with covid-19 after this period. In both cases, an mRNA vaccine will be given as a booster dose (Pfizer or Moderna).

According to the latest update from the Ministry of Health, the protocol is applicable to all people “With a history of symptomatic or asymptomatic infection” by the coronavirus. Also in the case of self-diagnosis by antigen testing. This same recommendation also applies in the case of health workers, as evidenced by the last update of the sectoral immunization plan. The document considers the only exception to this rule the case of residents of centers for the elderly, as well as very dependent people and people at very high risk.

At this time, as was done at the start of the vaccination campaign, the administration of third doses is available according to age groups and age groups. Right now, in most Autonomous Health Communities, nursing home workers, teachers and “essential staff”, you can already make an appointment for your booster dose. The call also includes the population over 40 who received their full immunization schedule more than six months ago (in case the deadline is shorter, in fact, the protocol provides for allowing this interval to pass). As announced by the health authorities, the the call will be broadened in the coming weeks to other age groups.

Third dose campaign

At present, according to the latest report from the Ministry of Health, about 80% of the Spanish population has a full directive against covid-19 and 84% have at least one dose against the virus. Booster doses have already been delivered to 88% of people over 70, 78% of people between 60 and 69 years, 36% of 50-59 years and 18% of 40 years. and 49 years old. Finally, we also calculate that un 63% of people vaccinated with Janssen (who only received one dose of this formula) was given a booster dose to boost his immunity. In total, it is estimated that in Spain there are already 14,918,066 people who suffered this additional puncture to protect yourself from the virus.


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Governor Whitmer announces $ 5 million in grants to Michigan communities to hire first responders https://h-fan.net/governor-whitmer-announces-5-million-in-grants-to-michigan-communities-to-hire-first-responders/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 14:01:00 +0000 https://h-fan.net/governor-whitmer-announces-5-million-in-grants-to-michigan-communities-to-hire-first-responders/ LANSING, Michigan (WILX) – There are many communities in the state need police, firefighters and paramedics. Now the state will help them fill these positions. Governor Gretchen Whitmer announced a $ 5 million grant program help local communities recruit and train first responders. $ 2 million of that money is set aside for low income […]]]>

LANSING, Michigan (WILX) – There are many communities in the state need police, firefighters and paramedics. Now the state will help them fill these positions.

Governor Gretchen Whitmer announced a $ 5 million grant program help local communities recruit and train first responders. $ 2 million of that money is set aside for low income communities with a per capita property value of less than $ 15,000.

“First responders are on the front lines of our health and safety, and are always there for us when we need them most,” said Governor Whitmer. noted. “We have to work together to put them first. We need to find ways to recruit and train the next generation of these true community heroes today so that they can be there for us tomorrow. With these new grants, we can hire more law enforcement officers, firefighters, paramedics, paramedics and local correctional officers to keep us all safe.

Cities, townships and counties have until February 15 Apply for a grant of up to $ 100,000 related to the training and recruitment of first responders. In their request, communities must include the goal of their program; demonstrate how budgeted costs relate directly to recruiting or training first responders.

Priority will be given to projects completed by September 30.

“Michigan communities are making the recruitment and training of first responders a priority,” said State Treasurer Rachael Eubanks noted. “These dollars will help our communities provide better services to keep Michigan residents safe.”

More from WILX: Grant aims to equip Michigan schools with more counselors, social workers and nurses

East Lansing Police say goodbye to one of the best

Emergency crews called in to burn down barn in Locke Township, damaged equipment

DeWitt Township first responder dies of COVID at work

Copyright 2022 WILX. All rights reserved.

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San Diego County has created a COVID-19 alert system. Does he pay attention to danger signs? https://h-fan.net/san-diego-county-has-created-a-covid-19-alert-system-does-he-pay-attention-to-danger-signs/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 13:00:37 +0000 https://h-fan.net/san-diego-county-has-created-a-covid-19-alert-system-does-he-pay-attention-to-danger-signs/ In June 2020, the San Diego County Public Health Department adopted a set of 13 triggers designed to signal that the coronavirus pandemic was worsening and that additional measures were needed to regain control of viral transmission. Eighteen months later, six of those indicators are in the red, enough to trigger a change in existing […]]]>

In June 2020, the San Diego County Public Health Department adopted a set of 13 triggers designed to signal that the coronavirus pandemic was worsening and that additional measures were needed to regain control of viral transmission.

Eighteen months later, six of those indicators are in the red, enough to trigger a change in existing health orders. But there is no indication that anyone in the county government intends to make any changes, even as the region has a record number of new cases and emergency rooms are inundated with patients positive for the coronavirus.

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Why hasn’t the region’s public health authority made any changes when its own triggers have flipped?

Neither Dr Wilma Wooten, the region’s public health official, nor any of his deputies answered the question directly last week. The county communications office said in a short note, not attributed to anyone in particular, that the county “constantly monitors and uses the trigger metric to inform local decision-making,” but “decisions are made on the basis of base of all information, ”including knowledge gained long after the triggers were first designed 18 months ago.

Rather than altering its list of triggers, local public health authorities have generally followed state guidelines, at least at the pandemic policy level. County supervisors did not respond when asked through their communications officers to comment on the situation.

Anyone can see that the pandemic landscape has changed dramatically, with the advent of an effective vaccine adding a mountain of hope to the picture. This key element appears to be a major factor in the health service’s reluctance to make major changes – such as reinstating trade restrictions – as its trigger warning system has sent red flags.

“San Diego County has since grown into one of the most vaccinated populations in the state and the number of hospitalizations is well below 12 months, along with the rollout of emerging treatments for those most at risk,” indicates the county press release.

Other major California metropolitan areas have been more energetic in recent months.

Los Angeles and San Francisco, after keeping masking rules indoors when they fell in most communities across the state this summer, both instituted proof of vaccination requirements for bars, gyms, restaurants and other places accessible to the public, although anecdotal reports of uneven application have raised many questions about their effectiveness.

The latest figures do not seem to suggest that San Diego has suffered from its more open approach, as the arrival of a more contagious variant of Omicron has caused cases to skyrocket. Since Saturday, the state’s coronavirus website LA listed with a case rate of 76 per 100,000 population, with San Francisco reaching 69 and San Diego 64.

So far, California’s pandemic position has remained much more open than it was in late 2020 and early 2021. A wide range of businesses and locations have remained open as cases increased.

But momentum is building within academia towards a more aggressive approach, especially as reports of overwhelmed hospitals continue to surface in communities across the country.

Two weeks ago, two Harvard professors urged Dr Rochelle Walensky, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in a letter later shared online, to consider short-term closures to slow the spread of the virus “with the narrow aim of avoiding catastrophic hospital overload and the preventable death and suffering that would otherwise ensue,” when rates of High infections generate more admissions than can be handled.

Often referred to as “circuit breaker” shutdowns, the idea sparks significant debate in the UK, with a group of researchers modeling the effects of a two week break from most activities in places where case rates are increasing very rapidly. Research results revealed that such a shutdown, if a large enough segment of the population complied with it, could function as a kind of ‘time reset’, breaking the chains of person-to-person transmission for long enough to make it happen. that the number of recent infections, hospitalizations and deaths could be drastically reduced.

So far, however, there has been little response to the US call for any kind of shutdown.

In San Diego County, the path is more visible than in most cities due to the formalized trigger system which states that “the order of the health officer will be changed” when certain parameters no longer comply. This week alone, a new indicator that shows how quickly local hospital beds are filling has turned red. The trigger is considered normal as long as the percentage of locally hospitalized COVID-19 patients increases at a rate of less than 10 percent, a number that is calculated by comparing the subsequent three-day averages of overall hospitalization for all non-centers. military medical officers in the region.

Last week, the growth rate was listed at minus 4.5, meaning the number of hospital patients with confirmed cases of COVID-19 was declining. Last week, the number skyrocketed, hitting 19.7% in just one week. The spike coincided with a crush of residents arriving at local emergency rooms, forcing many facilities to temporarily divert ambulance traffic even though most would have mild illness and some appeared to be trying to shorten the long lines of ambulance. waiting in test centers.

Other triggers such as the local case rate, the number of outbreaks in the local community, the number of people with symptoms of COVID-19 or flu-like, and the percentage of new cases reported. timely investigation by the health department were all in the red.


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Record Year for Medavie Health Services for Residents of Saskatoon and Area https://h-fan.net/record-year-for-medavie-health-services-for-residents-of-saskatoon-and-area/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 20:25:54 +0000 https://h-fan.net/record-year-for-medavie-health-services-for-residents-of-saskatoon-and-area/ This year marks 45 years that Medavie (formerly Ambulance MD) has served the residents of Saskatoon and surrounding communities. Medavie said 2021 has turned out to be a record year with record call volumes, record quantities of Narcan administered, constant changes to personal protective equipment requirements for paramedics, change issues supply with the pandemic, additional […]]]>

This year marks 45 years that Medavie (formerly Ambulance MD) has served the residents of Saskatoon and surrounding communities.

Medavie said 2021 has turned out to be a record year with record call volumes, record quantities of Narcan administered, constant changes to personal protective equipment requirements for paramedics, change issues supply with the pandemic, additional ambulances and the hiring of 24 additional paramedics.

Read more:

At least 5 paramedics in Saskatoon infected with COVID-19

“COVID has been a challenge for everyone in the EMS industry, we still have not gone through this pandemic and we have seen that it is taking a toll on the residents of our communities that we serve,” said Medavie.

This year there were a total of 39,836 EMS responses, which is a 15% increase from 2020. Medavie says 604 doses of Narcan were administered in 2021, up from 460 in 2020. Medavie states that this does not include patients who received Narcan. before his arrival and some patients required multiple doses.

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Two 24-hour ambulances were added to their fleet due to increased call volumes over several years. A 12 hour ambulance is now on duty to assist with response times in the Martensville, Warman and other northern communities.

Medavie says 24 paramedics were hired in 2021, as well as a full-time paramedic for the Saskatoon Tribal Health Bus, which serves First Nations communities.

Read more:

Overdoses, Narcan uses spike to record levels in Saskatoon, according to Medavie

“The stress of being a paramedic has never been higher,” said Troy Davies, director of public affairs, Medavie Health Services West, in a press release. “With higher call volumes, increased pressures with COVID, and calls associated with the pandemic (like mental health and addiction), our staff have never been so busy. We would like to thank the Ministry of Health and the Saskatchewan Health Authority for increasing the number of ambulances which allowed us to hire 24 additional paramedics in 2021.

Davies adds that they don’t expect their call volumes to drop anytime soon, so the additional ambulances have had an impact on their staff and response times.


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New Medavie Health Services trailer dedicated to Saskatchewan. NHL Legend – Sep 1, 2021

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Cox and Mercy Reflect on COVID-19 Response in 2021; propose plans to improve healthcare in 2022 https://h-fan.net/cox-and-mercy-reflect-on-covid-19-response-in-2021-propose-plans-to-improve-healthcare-in-2022/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 03:43:00 +0000 https://h-fan.net/cox-and-mercy-reflect-on-covid-19-response-in-2021-propose-plans-to-improve-healthcare-in-2022/ SPRINGFIELD, Mo. (KY3) – In 2021, Springfield saw a massive influx of COVID-19 patients as the Delta variant ramped up. This not only led to the filling of hospital beds, but also the exhaustion of healthcare workers. CoxHealth and Mercy reflected on the lessons they learned from 2021 and how it will improve healthcare in […]]]>

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. (KY3) – In 2021, Springfield saw a massive influx of COVID-19 patients as the Delta variant ramped up. This not only led to the filling of hospital beds, but also the exhaustion of healthcare workers.

CoxHealth and Mercy reflected on the lessons they learned from 2021 and how it will improve healthcare in Southwest Missouri in 2022.

Both hospitals say the biggest takeaway is that healthcare workers have learned to adapt quickly. Care plans for patients were constantly changing as more and more information about the virus came out, which led to much more flexibility.

Mercy Springfield President Craig McCoy said flexibility will improve routine care in the future.

“Expect the unexpected,” McCoy says. “You don’t know where the next variant will come from, what it will look like, what its impact will be. Is it going to be serious, not as serious? It’s constantly evolving and we’re constantly learning more about it.

CoxHealth President and CEO Steve Edwards said the Delta variant has put the hospital system on its heels.

“Our staff were not prepared for this massive increase,” Edwards. “We have seen more patients after delta than with the original ancestral strain. I think we have learned that this pandemic is going to continue in a complicated way. “

Edwards says the speed and agility of CoxHealth’s healthcare workers saved lives.

“We were looking at data from previous years that had been compiled from a study three to five years old,” says Edwards. “Now we are reviewing the pre-prints released yesterday and changing our practices. It made our team much more agile. We are communicating with our doctors much better than ever. I think it saves lives.

However, Edwards says it’s not just about getting new information, but also implementing it effectively.

“It’s not uncommon for us to read and change policy in every hospital overnight, which could have been a bureaucratic nightmare three years ago,” says Edwards. “It took maybe six months and now we’re doing it overnight.”

For Mercy, McCoy says there is also pressure for a greater focus on access to care in small communities in 2022.

“How do we use our smaller regional facilities to provide this care,” says McCoy. “How do we continue to develop our resources in these communities to access them so that people don’t have to travel to Springfield to go to a bigger hospital for things they could have done in their community.”

For CoxHealth, Edwards says he expects demand for health services to continue to grow, which has led the hospital to open new super clinics.

“Big projects that reorient care closer to the patient instead of coming together in large academic medical centers,” says Edwards. “We will be more in the community, so we are developing these 30,000 square foot clinics. We also have other programs designed more around Medicare patients. “

Shortage of nurses:

Edwards says one of her main concerns at CoxHealth is the nursing shortage she faces and the mental toll the pandemic has caused to workers.

“It’s a type of event that forms PTSD,” Edwards says. “I think what makes them especially difficult for them is how hard they work for the patients and sometimes we have imbalanced patients and families who don’t understand this disease.”

Edwards says Cox College has seen growth over the past year, with increased interest in careers in health care.

“A lot of people have been drawn to healthcare because they see the difference people make in healthcare,” says Edwards.

At Mercy, McCoy says they created retention plans to prevent nurses from moving elsewhere for higher paying jobs.

“We knew there would be nursing shortages ahead,” McCoy says. “They were planned for several years, so it accelerated due to the pandemic.”

The retention plan includes additional benefits, more mental health resources, and loyalty bonuses for workers.

“Staffing and staffing shortages are a daily concern and it will take several years for this to be corrected, I believe,” said McCoy. “It’s a question of every day, how we build and work to fill the pipeline of people who come in. “

McCoy says that aside from staff retention, the focus is also on recruiting new healthcare workers.

“It tries to address the people who are in school, the people who want to go back to school and how do we impact that,” McCoy says. “There is the problem of supply and demand and that is why he is working with nursing boards and other parties to be able to increase the capacity of nursing schools.”

Fight against disinformation:

Edwards says there has been a lot of misinformation about the virus and the vaccine.

“I naively thought about the power of information that would do everything, but it also amplifies or amplifies disinformation,” Edwards says. “We cannot follow the misinformation. Every day there are four or five new theories, it seems they are wrong.

Edwards says CoxHealth has been and will continue to try to combat this.

“We were much more communicative than ever,” says Edwards. “Posting videos and information in all ways, but social media amplifies this misinformation and I don’t know how to deal with it. “

McCoy says Mercy will focus on continuing to impart science to people to try and combat disinformation.

“You’re not going to get 100% of people to agree,” says McCoy. “It’s a question of whether we can get a majority of people to lay down their political arms if you want to and stop and focus and start looking outside what I gain and how can- we better benefit the community as a whole. I think that’s where we need to come back.

To report a correction or typo, please send an email digitalnews@ky3.com

Copyright 2021 KY3. All rights reserved.


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The Covid “is absolutely raging” in the communities https://h-fan.net/the-covid-is-absolutely-raging-in-the-communities/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 09:00:01 +0000 https://h-fan.net/the-covid-is-absolutely-raging-in-the-communities/ The CEO of the Health Service Executive said there was “no doubt now” that Covid-19 “is absolutely rampant in our communities”. Paul Reid said there is an “unprecedented level of future testing volumes,” and the HSE is seeing a positivity rate of up to 50% in the community. “If you think you have Covid, it […]]]>

The CEO of the Health Service Executive said there was “no doubt now” that Covid-19 “is absolutely rampant in our communities”.

Paul Reid said there is an “unprecedented level of future testing volumes,” and the HSE is seeing a positivity rate of up to 50% in the community.

“If you think you have Covid, it is very likely that you have it,” he told RTÉ’s Morning Ireland.

Mr Reid said 250,000 PCR tests were done in the past week, with most people getting tested the same day or the next.

However, he acknowledged that there were delays and urged the public to “stay with us” as the HSE works to resolve this issue.

The testing capacity is increased, he added.

Mr Reid said the HSE is gaining experience from the spread of the virus to other countries, such as the UK, the Netherlands, Denmark and Canada, which are “probably further ahead than we”.

He said Ireland was still at the start of an “upward curve” and what was expected is happening now.

“It looks like there is a spike at some point,” he said. “We are certainly not there yet.”


Read more:
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“Unprecedented” PCR request as positivity approaches 50%
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Mr Reid repeated calls for those who are not vaccinated to come forward for a vaccine, adding that hospital consultants have reported higher levels of disease in those who are not vaccinated.

He said Ireland has now reached a milestone, with more than two million boosters, or third doses for those who are immunocompromised, administered.

The HSE said yesterday that nearly one in two people in the community now test positive for Covid-19, and the current demand for testing is unprecedented.

He warned that this could lead to longer wait times for PCR tests and that those who show symptoms or test positive for the antigen should restrict their movements until they are at least 48 hours without. symptoms.

The Ministry of Health yesterday confirmed 6,735 new cases of Covid-19.

As of 8 a.m. this morning, 521 patients infected with the virus were hospitalized, including 91 in intensive care.


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Reflections of 2021: “Our communities are still in mourning” https://h-fan.net/reflections-of-2021-our-communities-are-still-in-mourning/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 12:51:46 +0000 https://h-fan.net/reflections-of-2021-our-communities-are-still-in-mourning/ Details Through Levi Rickert December 26, 2021 Opinion. The end of the year is an opportunity for reflection. Reflecting on this past year, I realize that it has been filled with frustrations and challenges as the COVID-19 pandemic continued with the deadly virus affecting family and friends in our tribal communities, as well as everything […]]]>

Opinion. The end of the year is an opportunity for reflection.

Reflecting on this past year, I realize that it has been filled with frustrations and challenges as the COVID-19 pandemic continued with the deadly virus affecting family and friends in our tribal communities, as well as everything else. the world in the world.

Want more Indigenous news? Get the free daily newsletter today.

Beyond the COVID-19 pandemic in the Indian country, Native News Online has covered stories just as difficult to cover, such as the issue of missing and murdered Indigenous peoples and the residential school tragedies.

While these topics are difficult to cover, Native News Online understands the importance of amplifying stories that have been historically ignored and overlooked by the mainstream (colonizing) media.

Even amid the heavy news surrounding Indian Country, many stories of progress have stood out regarding our tribal communities. To be sure, the $ 61 billion allocated through the federal government by the Biden administration and Congress has been unprecedented, historic and significant.

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As the Editor-in-Chief of Native News Online, I would like to highlight three important stories about the Indian country that stood out to me in 2021:

High vaccination rates

After suffering some of the worst COVID-19 results among any racial / ethnic group in the United States, great strides have been made after vaccinations have made their way into tribal communities.

Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) show that Native Americans and Alaska Natives were 3.3 times more likely to be hospitalized and 2.2 times more likely to die from COVID-19 than their white counterparts.

According to the Indian Health Service (IHS), more than 1.7 million COVID-19 vaccines were administered to tribal citizens, tribal health workers and essential workers in the Indian country. On the Navajo Nation, the country’s largest Indian reservation, 70 percent of the population was fully vaccinated in September, against 58 percent of the country’s general population. This is a testament to the deep sense of community among Native Americans and tribal nations.

Dr Jill Biden

The contributions of the first lady are often overlooked in presidential administrations. Dr. Jill Biden, our current First Lady, is accomplished in her own right as an educator with a PhD in Education. His visit to three tribal nations this year should not be overlooked. In my research, I did not find another First Lady who visited so many tribal nations in history.

In April, First Lady Biden visited the Navajo Nation Window Rock in Arizona. In October, she visited the Saginaw Chippewa Indian tribe in Michigan. And, in December, she and U.S. Home Secretary Deb Haaland visited the Cherokee Nation in Tahlequah, Oklahoma.

I covered her visit to the Isabella Indian Reservation in Michigan in October. She left Biden Delaware’s home in the early hours of a Sunday morning to visit the tribe for an afternoon to learn how the tribe, especially students and their families, handled the pandemic. I realized that she could have stayed home and spent time with her family that Sunday. But she chose to come spend it with us.

Secretary Deb Haaland

In March, Deb Haaland (Laguna Pueblo) was sworn in as the 54th secretary of the US Department of the Interior. When she was sworn in, she became the first Native American to hold a post in the presidential cabinet in American history.

Another bright moment for me came in mid-June when Secretary Haaland addressed the National Congress of American Indian at its mid-year convention. This came three weeks after reports that the remains of 215 children were discovered in a mass grave at the former Kamloops Indian Residential School in British Columbia, Canada.

As she announced the creation of the Federal Indian Residential Schools Initiative, Haaland said:

“I cried with the aboriginal members of our team here at Interior. Our communities are still in mourning.

Here is the First Native American Presidential Secretary telling the nation what we in Indian country already knew: “Our communities are still in mourning. I remember tears coming to my eyes as I watched her speak.

The determination and speed with which the boarding school initiative has been put in place have been impressive. There is no doubt in my mind that if she had not been the head of the Home Office at this point in history, there would have been no initiative to investigate the matter today. hui.

I believe, along with many others in Indigenous communities, that this is the start of a long-awaited calculation by the federal government and that it will serve as a step towards healing for American Indians, Indigenous people. of Alaska and First Nations peoples.

As 2021 draws to a close, starting early this week, Native News Online will highlight our most read articles and some of our favorites, as well as a memorial to some of those we have lost in the Indian country. Last year. Thank you, our readers, for following and sharing our news and also for telling your stories. You are an important part of our work. Without our readers, we wouldn’t exist.

As we take advantage of the last week of 2021 and plan for the year ahead, I ask you to join us and make a year-end donation at Native News Online.

I hope I can count on your support as we approach next year and continue to tell the stories of the Indian country that are worth telling.

More stories like this

A year of challenges and triumphs for the Indian country
Journalist’s notebook: Reflection on a past Christmas
Wounded Knee Massacre 131 Years Ago: We Remember Those Lost
The Devil in the Details: A Journey from Aztec Knowledge to Colonized Faith in Pastorelas’ Christmas Tale

We are still in 2021. Before leaving …

This month, we’re asking our readers to help us raise $ 20,000 to fund our Indigenous-run newsroom. If you’re a regular Native News Online reader, you know that we bring an Indigenous perspective to the news and report important stories that the mainstream media often overlooks. While our news is free for everyone to read, it is not free to produce. That’s why we’re asking you to make a donation this month to help us continue to produce quality journalism and raise Indigenous voices. Any contribution of any amount, big or small, gives us a better and stronger future and allows us to remain a force for change. Donate to Native News Online today and support independent Indigenous journalism. Thank you.

About the Author

Levi Rickert
Author: Levi RickertE-mail: This e-mail address is protected from spam. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Levi Rickert (Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation) is the Founder, Publisher and Editor-in-Chief of Native News Online. He can be contacted at [email protected]



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COVID-19 cases in multiple communities lead to Nunavut-wide restrictions https://h-fan.net/covid-19-cases-in-multiple-communities-lead-to-nunavut-wide-restrictions/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 16:55:00 +0000 https://h-fan.net/covid-19-cases-in-multiple-communities-lead-to-nunavut-wide-restrictions/ New cases in Sanirajak, Rankin Inlet, Pangnirtung and Iqaluit place restrictions on Christmas Eve Non-essential trips and gatherings stop across Nunavut this Christmas Eve as cases of COVID-19 were discovered in several communities overnight. Sanirajak and Rankin Inlet each have a case, Nunavut’s chief public health officer Dr Michael Patterson said Friday morning. Iqaluit and […]]]>

New cases in Sanirajak, Rankin Inlet, Pangnirtung and Iqaluit place restrictions on Christmas Eve

Non-essential trips and gatherings stop across Nunavut this Christmas Eve as cases of COVID-19 were discovered in several communities overnight.

Sanirajak and Rankin Inlet each have a case, Nunavut’s chief public health officer Dr Michael Patterson said Friday morning. Iqaluit and Pangnirtung, where COVID-19 was already present, now have three cases each, bringing the total to eight nationwide.

All non-essential travel, especially inter-community travel, is strongly discouraged, Patterson said.

The restrictions for each community in Nunavut include:

  • Outdoor gatherings are limited to five people.
  • No public gathering inside is allowed.
  • Up to five visitors are allowed in a house, but only for essential or emergency services.
  • Libraries, galleries, theaters, fitness centers, swimming pools and arenas are closed.
  • Places of worship are closed.
  • All non-essential businesses and government offices are closed.
  • Bars and licensed establishments are closed.
  • Restaurants can only open for take out.
  • All personal services including chiropractors, massage therapists, beauty salons and hairdressers are closed.
  • In-person group counseling sessions are not permitted.
  • No visitors to long-term care and senior care facilities are allowed.
  • The parks are closed.

Travel to and from Rankin Inlet is limited to essential purposes only, and travel to and from Pangnirtung and Iqaluit is also limited to essential purposes.

Residents of these communities can return home.

Anyone who is not vaccinated three times – two doses of the vaccine and a booster – must self-isolate for 14 days when entering Nunavut.

Schools will remain closed until January 10 or until Patterson says otherwise.

Day care centers can remain open to care for the children of essential workers.

The new restrictions went into effect at noon on Christmas Eve.

“We must act quickly to help trace and contain the epidemic,” he said, calling the approach restrictions a “blackout” to prevent the disease from entering more communities.

On Wednesday, the Department of Health announced that a case of the virus had been detected in a person who had not left Iqaluit for more than a month, leading health officials to believe community transmission was already in play.

“I understand this will make the holiday season more difficult for many, but it is necessary for the health and safety of our communities and loved ones,” Patterson said.

The Government of Nunavut also issued exposure advisories for three flights on Friday:

  • Dec 20 : Flight # 5T101 from Ottawa to Iqaluit, rows 1 to 7
  • Dec 21 : Flight # 5T101 from Ottawa to Iqaluit, rows 10 to 22
  • December 23: Flight # 5T872 from Iqaluit to Sanirajak, rows 1 to 4

Anyone who was in an affected row is urged to self-isolate for 14 days from the date of the theft and to call the COVID-19 hotline at 1-888-975-8601 to get tested immediately, whether they are vaccinated or not.

Other passengers on flights are advised to self-monitor and get tested if symptoms develop.

Nunavut MP Lori Idlout announced in a written statement Friday that she had tested positive for COVID-19 and was isolating herself at her home in Iqaluit.

Nunavummiut workers are also sent home from Agnico Eagle mining operations for three weeks, with 13 cases detected from December 18 to 22.

None of the people with COVID-19 in the mines are Nunavummiut, company spokeswoman Sonja Galton confirmed on Friday.


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Wolf Administration Reminds Pennsylvanians of Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders Resources This Holiday Season https://h-fan.net/wolf-administration-reminds-pennsylvanians-of-mental-health-and-substance-use-disorders-resources-this-holiday-season/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 19:39:24 +0000 https://h-fan.net/wolf-administration-reminds-pennsylvanians-of-mental-health-and-substance-use-disorders-resources-this-holiday-season/ Harrisburg, Pennsylvania – Today, members of the Wolf Administration reminded Pennsylvanians of the resources available this holiday season for individuals and families affected by mental health and addiction disorders (SUD). The departments of Drug and Alcohol Programs (DDAP), Health (DOH), Social Services (DHS), Aging (PDA) and the Governor’s Office for Advocacy and Reform have come […]]]>

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania – Today, members of the Wolf Administration reminded Pennsylvanians of the resources available this holiday season for individuals and families affected by mental health and addiction disorders (SUD).

The departments of Drug and Alcohol Programs (DDAP), Health (DOH), Social Services (DHS), Aging (PDA) and the Governor’s Office for Advocacy and Reform have come together to strengthen the commitment of The Wolf administration to highlight mental health and trauma services and resources for substance use disorders that are available year-round, but often increasingly needed during the holiday season.

“It is a joyous time of the year, but it can also be a difficult time for many Pennsylvanians for many different reasons. During this holiday season, it is important to remind those dealing with grief, l ‘anxiety, isolation or substance abuse that no one is ever alone; there are always resources available to help, “said DDAP Secretary Jen Smith.” I urge all Pennsylvanians to offer their support to a friend or loved one who might need the courage to seek the help and resources they need and deserve. ”

The Pennsylvania Mental Health Resource Guide offers information on mental health screenings, finding a mental health professional, locating a SUD treatment provider, resources for insecurity of the housing, help with trauma due to racism, and help contacting help desks in your county and applying for benefits.

National lifeline for suicide prevention

The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is a national network of local crisis centers that provide free, confidential emotional support, in English and Spanish, to people in suicidal crisis or in emotional distress 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Localized text is also available through the Crisis Text Line, offering free 24/7 assistance by texting “PA” to 741741.

Public aid programs

DHS encourages Pennsylvanians who are struggling to meet their basic needs to apply for programs that can help them meet their basic needs during the winter months. Programs including Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), Cash Assistance, Medical Assistance, Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), Consumer Assistance Program Low Income Home Energy (LIHEAP) and Emergency Rent Assistance Program (ERAP) and other programs can be requested anytime at www.compass.state.pa.us. For more information on the assistance programs available to help Pennsylvanians, visit www.dhs.pa.gov.

“The holidays are here, and while it can be a joyous time for so many, the ongoing pandemic continues to wreak havoc in different ways, especially as we are seeing an increase in COVID-19 cases again. “Many of us face change, loss, burnout and stress. Know that if you are going through difficult times, you don’t have to carry those feelings alone,” said Acting DHS Secretary Meg Snead . “These services are there to help us get through tough times – please let them help you, or share them with someone you love who needs a helping hand.”

Assistance and referral line

Free resources are available to help Pennsylvanians with mental health needs and connect to longer term support in their community. Pennsylvanians struggling with anxiety and other mental health issues can contact the toll-free 24/7 helpline at 1-855-284-2494. For TTY, dial 724-631-5600. Helpline staff are trained to be accessible, culturally competent, and qualified to assist people with mental illness, developmental disabilities, concurrent disorders, other special needs, or anyone seeking help. ‘a compassionate and empathetic person to listen to. Staff are trained in trauma-informed care to listen, assess needs, triage calls, and provide appropriate referral to community resources for children, adolescents, adults and special populations, including historically marginalized groups and children. long-term behavioral health supports.

“The holiday season comes with expectations of joy and happiness, but not everyone experiences this time of year. Perhaps this year in particular, the need for being aware of trauma throughout the holidays is essential 2021 has been a time of great stress, fear and heartache for so many people, ”said Dan Jurman, executive director of the governor’s office for advocacy and reform. “We want to encourage Pennsylvania residents to be aware of the additional stressors while on vacation and the potentially difficult sensitivities of past and present experiences that can have a deep and pervasive impact on people this season.”

Get help now

Individuals seeking substance abuse treatment or recovery resources for themselves or a loved one can call the free PA Get Help Now helpline at 1-800-662-HELP (4357). This helpline is confidential, available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, and staffed by trained professionals who will connect callers with resources in their community. Appellants may also be eligible for funding if they need help paying for their treatment. A live chat option is also available online or via text message to 717-216-0905 for those looking for help and who might not be comfortable talking to a helpline operator.

“The hotline is available daily, including Christmas Eve and Day and New Years Eve and New Years,” Smith said. “Please feel free to contact and use this helpline. Whether you are recovering, seeking treatment for the first time, or need information on how you can help or support the journey. loved one, there’s always someone on the other end of the line to help you navigate the resources available throughout the holiday season and beyond. “

Naloxone

Naloxone is a drug that can reverse an overdose caused by an opioid drug (i.e., prescription pain relievers or heroin). When given in an overdose, naloxone blocks the effects of opioids on the brain and restores breathing. A standing order from general practitioner Dr Denise Johnson allows quick access to the drug, as Pennsylvanians can get naloxone at local Commonwealth pharmacies. People can also receive naloxone at home when they take a short training course through a partnership with NEXT Distro.

“Naloxone training can be completed in minutes and the administration of naloxone is safe and does not require specialist medical knowledge,” said GP Dr. Denise Johnson. “We are committed to ensuring equal access to treatments, including naloxone in pharmacies, no matter where you live, because we know that substance use disorders affect all communities. Today, Pennsylvanians who are at risk of an opioid-related overdose, or who are family, friends, or others who can help someone at risk for an opioid-related overdose, can now get naloxone at their local pharmacy due to standing order from the Department of Health. “

Resources for Seniors

PA Link to Aging and Disability Resource Centers, also known as PA Link, helps older people and people with disabilities by providing them with information and connecting them with supports, including assistive technology to access telehealth services, registration calls and options to help reduce isolation. Any senior in need of assistance can contact the PA Link call center by phone at 1-800-753-8827 or online at www.carelink.pa.gov.

Additionally, Pennsylvania’s 52 Regional Aging Agencies (AAAs), spanning 67 counties in the Commonwealth of Nations, offer virtual and in-person activities, including health and wellness programs. Seniors can locate their local agency on aging here.

“Seniors who feel depressed or isolated may experience a decline in their physical well-being and quality of life. The Department of Aging and our AAA Network are committed to helping Pennsylvania seniors maintain good mental health During the holiday season, if a senior is struggling emotionally or mentally, we want them to understand that they are not alone and that there are many resources to support them. safety – in person or virtually – with like-minded people to socialize and participate in activities. I encourage any senior who could benefit from these resources to contact us, “said Secretary of Aging Robert Torres.

DHS and PDA also want grandparents raising their grandchildren as well as other family members such as aunts, uncles and cousins, who find themselves caring for children who have lost. their parents, or whose parents are unable to be their primary caregiver, know that help is available through the KinConnector helpline. The helpline is made up of Kinship Navigators – compassionate and knowledgeable social service professionals ready to help families locate, understand and access resources that can help them during the holiday season. You can reach him by calling 1-866-KIN-2111 (1-866-546-2111) or online at kinconnector.org.

For more information on mental health and SOUTH treatment options in Pennsylvania, county resources, and the Wolf Administration’s efforts to connect individuals with mental and emotional support and local resources, visit pa .gov / mental-health.

CONTACT WITH THE MEDIA: Ali Gantz, DDAP, algantz@pa.gov
Brandon Cwalina, DHS, ra-pwdhspressoffice@pa.gov
Mark O’Neill, DOH, RA-DHpressoffice@pa.gov
Jack Eilber, PDA, agingcomms @ pa.gov


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