Health Initiatives – H Fan http://h-fan.net/ Sun, 15 May 2022 17:03:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://h-fan.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2-150x150.png Health Initiatives – H Fan http://h-fan.net/ 32 32 Detailing the latest lung health data from ATS 2022 https://h-fan.net/detailing-the-latest-lung-health-data-from-ats-2022/ Sun, 15 May 2022 17:03:45 +0000 https://h-fan.net/detailing-the-latest-lung-health-data-from-ats-2022/ Location is everything – it’s a phrase you may have heard at some point, and it’s a phrase that comes true when discussing lung health with Al Rizzo, MD, Chief Medical Officer of the American Lung Association (ALA) and host of the monthly respiratory health podcast Lungcast. HCP Live met Dr. Rizzo at the American […]]]>

Location is everything – it’s a phrase you may have heard at some point, and it’s a phrase that comes true when discussing lung health with Al Rizzo, MD, Chief Medical Officer of the American Lung Association (ALA) and host of the monthly respiratory health podcast Lungcast.

HCP Live met Dr. Rizzo at the American Thoracic Society’s 2022 International Conference in San Francisco to talk about all things pulmonology, including the 2022 State of the Air Report released by ALA in late April.

The 23rd version of the report found that more than 137 million Americans live in areas with unhealthy levels of particulate pollution or ozone.

“Usually these are people with lung diseases such as asthma and COPD having increased symptoms during times when there are high ozone levels or high particulate pollution,” Rizzo said. in terms of how it affects people with lung disease, Rizzo said. pollution is more difficult to remove, but air quality indices can be used, and many municipalities and local radio stations often report the air quality index daily.

He added that the report is being conducted in a way that allows the public as well as municipalities and state legislatures to advocate for changes to clean air initiatives. This is especially helpful when discussing some of the health disparities that exist due to heavy pollution in more racially and ethnically diverse populations across the country.

“The social determinants of health are affected by where people live, where they work, whether they have access to care or insurance – all of these factors play a role,” he said. “And if you’re someone who has to live in an area where the air quality isn’t as good, you’re going to have symptoms, (and) you may not have access to the care that you need or cannot avoid this area due to your limited resources.

Likewise, allergies can also affect lung health, especially as we continue to experience longer and more severe allergy seasons. Rizzo attributed, in part, to climate change, saying it also leads to drier seasons and more wildfires.

During the second half of the interview, the conversation turned to several lung conditions currently being highlighted at ATS 2022, including pulmonary arterial hypertension.

“The main area where there is a lot of research and drug development is in high blood pressure which can be seen in people with interstitial lung diseases such as scleroderma and certainly those with primary high blood pressure,” said Rizzo said. “Much of the pulmonary hypertension that we see in many people is often secondary to heart or lung disease…so the drugs available for PAH are not as helpful for grades 2 and 3 of the World Health Organization.”

For more from Dr. Rizzo on advances in pulmonary medicine, as well as how these conditions might affect patients’ sleep health, watch the full interview above.

]]>
Purdue gets grant from mental health organization https://h-fan.net/purdue-gets-grant-from-mental-health-organization/ Fri, 13 May 2022 09:58:22 +0000 https://h-fan.net/purdue-gets-grant-from-mental-health-organization/ WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. – Purdue’s research into the cause and cure of Tourette’s Syndrome will be funded by a $2.6 million grant from the National Institute of Mental Health. Peristera Paschou, professor of biological sciences and associate dean for higher education and strategic initiatives at the College of Science, is the principal investigator for further […]]]>

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. – Purdue’s research into the cause and cure of Tourette’s Syndrome will be funded by a $2.6 million grant from the National Institute of Mental Health.

Peristera Paschou, professor of biological sciences and associate dean for higher education and strategic initiatives at the College of Science, is the principal investigator for further study of the syndrome.

Paschou leads several of Tourette’s global research collaborations. His work is supported by the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, and the National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Her previous work includes co-authoring a groundbreaking 2017 study that was the first in the world to identify Tourette syndrome risk genes. In 2021, she led a study that uncovered more about the common genetic basis of Tourette’s neurodevelopmental disorders.

]]>
Intermountain Healthcare Appoints First Chief Equity Officer | News, Sports, Jobs https://h-fan.net/intermountain-healthcare-appoints-first-chief-equity-officer-news-sports-jobs/ Tue, 10 May 2022 23:59:02 +0000 https://h-fan.net/intermountain-healthcare-appoints-first-chief-equity-officer-news-sports-jobs/ Photo provided, Intermountain Healthcare Tiffany Capeles has been named Intermountain Healthcare’s first Chief Equity Officer. Intermountain Healthcare has selected Tiffany Capeles as its first Chief Equity Officer for the healthcare system. Capeles comes from Texas-based CHRISTUS Health, where she was director of health equity, diversity and inclusion. His work has received numerous […]]]>

Photo provided, Intermountain Healthcare

Tiffany Capeles has been named Intermountain Healthcare’s first Chief Equity Officer.

Intermountain Healthcare has selected Tiffany Capeles as its first Chief Equity Officer for the healthcare system.

Capeles comes from Texas-based CHRISTUS Health, where she was director of health equity, diversity and inclusion. His work has received numerous national awards and earned him the 2021 Career Achievement Award from the National Association of Latino Healthcare Executives. In 2020, she was named one of the Top 25 Emerging Leaders by Modern Healthcare and received the Tomorrow’s Leaders Award from the Catholic Healthcare Association.

“I am very pleased to join Intermountain to help continue the important work that is already underway to ensure that all of the communities we serve receive the best care possible and feel welcomed and included in their experiences with Intermountain,” he said. she declared in a press. announcement. “We have a wonderful foundation here to build on.”

Capeles has extensive experience in diversity healthcare, according to the Intermountain press release. She will lead the organization’s efforts to expand health diversity, equity and inclusion for patients, caregivers and community members in the seven states it serves.

“Intermountain is committed to leading the country in eliminating health disparities and improving the health of everyone in our communities,” said Dr. Marc Harrison, CEO and President of Intermountain Healthcare. “Tiffany’s leadership and strong track record of achieving greater health equity has earned her the respect of our healthcare peers and national recognition.

Harrison said that from addressing the social determinants of health to promoting diversity and inclusion initiatives, Capeles will continue to address key elements of care.

One of the core values ​​of the Intermountain Health System is equity, recognizing that equity and inclusion are essential to healing and health care, according to the press release.

Capeles will also work closely with the Health System‘s Office of Equity and Inclusion and focus specifically on caregiver environments.

“Tiffany’s insightful approach and experience aligns well with our four pillars as we advance equity for our patients, members, caregivers and communities,” said Mikelle Moore, Senior Vice President and Director of Community Health for Intermountain. “She will provide visionary leadership that will continue to focus on equity as a social determinant of health to help people live the healthiest lives possible.”



Newsletter

Join thousands of people who already receive our daily newsletter.


]]>
Leumit Start partners with WeCcelerate to create a digital health accelerator https://h-fan.net/leumit-start-partners-with-weccelerate-to-create-a-digital-health-accelerator/ Mon, 09 May 2022 07:31:00 +0000 https://h-fan.net/leumit-start-partners-with-weccelerate-to-create-a-digital-health-accelerator/ Leumit Health Services has signed an agreement with WeCcelerate to create a digital health accelerator under Leumit’s technology and innovation project – Leumit Start. The purpose of this joint accelerator, called Leumit Weccelerate, is to guide novice entrepreneurs through the first steps, from initial idea to working product. The joint accelerator will select initiatives in […]]]>

Leumit Health Services has signed an agreement with WeCcelerate to create a digital health accelerator under Leumit’s technology and innovation project – Leumit Start. The purpose of this joint accelerator, called Leumit Weccelerate, is to guide novice entrepreneurs through the first steps, from initial idea to working product.

The joint accelerator will select initiatives in the areas of health with a focus on digital health, with Leumit providing clinical advice and guidance, access to anonymous databases for data research, advice for regulatory approvals, the Helsinki Committee, the conduct of clinical trials, pilots and product implementation. WeCcelerate now supports start-up entrepreneurs from the concept stage, through feasibility testing and market research, preparing a business plan, intellectual property aspects and legal issues, building a a company and its administrative skeleton, the recruitment of investors and more.

Leumit Health Services recently announced the creation of the Leumit Start project with the aim of increasing its business in the fields of health and presenting advanced solutions to Leumit customers, introducing advanced and innovative technologies for the benefit of its patients. , improving the quality of medicine and streamlining processes at the HMO. The project focuses on developing collaborations with leading startups, academic researchers, health organizations, and other sources in various areas of digital health.

“WeCcelerate joining forces with Leumit Start was natural. WeCcelerate has helped companies on their long journey from the early stages of business to a profitable and functioning business, said WeCcelerate CEO Alon Pinhas. “Now, after teaming up with Leumit, we are reaching out to newbie medical entrepreneurs and offering our integrated business model with clinical advice, access to anonymous databases, pilot execution, research and more.”

“The field of digital health offers endless possibilities for improving the quality of medicine,” said Leumit Start CEO Yizhar Laufer. “As part of the extensive activity of Leumit Health Services’ innovation and technology company – Leumit Start, we have decided to work with WeCcelerate and create a joint accelerator in the field of digital health and medical devices. With this new accelerator, we can reach out to first-time entrepreneurs as well and offer them comprehensive business advice, clinical and regulatory support that will help them take their idea from concept to fruition and success.

]]>
MyMichigan Health appoints Bryan Cross as COO https://h-fan.net/mymichigan-health-appoints-bryan-cross-as-coo/ Sat, 07 May 2022 09:08:32 +0000 https://h-fan.net/mymichigan-health-appoints-bryan-cross-as-coo/ Bryan Cross, Pharm.D., FACHE, has been named chief operating officer of MyMichigan Health, replacing Greg Rogers, who is now president and CEO of the health system. “MyMichigan’s more than 75-year history and its leaders have built a truly incredible organization,” Rogers said. “While upcoming healthcare trends and technological changes can be daunting, our culture is […]]]>

Bryan Cross, Pharm.D., FACHE, has been named chief operating officer of MyMichigan Health, replacing Greg Rogers, who is now president and CEO of the health system.

“MyMichigan’s more than 75-year history and its leaders have built a truly incredible organization,” Rogers said. “While upcoming healthcare trends and technological changes can be daunting, our culture is patient-centered, collaborative, strong and resilient; and I am confident that in the role of COO, Bryan is well qualified to lead us into the future. Bryan has been instrumental in many accomplishments over the years, one of which has been strong leadership through COVID-19.


With over 30 years of healthcare experience, Cross began his career at MyMichigan as a Paramedic Supervisor. After earning a Doctor of Pharmacy, he rose to director of pharmacy, then spent 13 years as corporate director of pharmacy, receiving the prestigious MidMichigan Health Chairman’s Award in 2006. Cross also served as vice- president of the professional services of the health system. where he was instrumental in the strategic planning and coordination of COVID-19 response initiatives and the immunization program. Most recently, he served as president of MyMichigan Medical Center Midland since March 2021. Cross also holds a master’s degree in business administration.

“Our healthcare system has gone through a very difficult time over the past two years with multiple waves of the COVID-19 pandemic, unprecedented demand for services and significant staffing shortages in multiple clinical disciplines,” said Cross. “The strength of the organization is evident as we have continued to provide excellent care to our patients as we successfully overcome these challenges. Looking to the future, MyMichigan Health has a bold vision for health care leadership in the state of Michigan. We will be leaders in innovation, rural health care delivery, clinical outcomes, growth, community engagement and sustainability, and I look forward to helping deliver on that vision. .

Bryan also noted that in his new role as COO, he plans to build on the legacy of Diane Postler-Slattery and help realize her vision.

Cross is married with four children, three of whom work or will soon work in the health field.

]]>
GSC plans possible mental health committee https://h-fan.net/gsc-plans-possible-mental-health-committee/ Thu, 05 May 2022 08:00:45 +0000 https://h-fan.net/gsc-plans-possible-mental-health-committee/ The Graduate Student Council (GSC) has planned to speak to representatives from Stanford Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) about forming a committee specifically focused on mental health at its Wednesday meeting. Counselors consistently requested increased mental health support and accessibility throughout the school year. The board unanimously approved a resolution last week that would provide […]]]>

The Graduate Student Council (GSC) has planned to speak to representatives from Stanford Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) about forming a committee specifically focused on mental health at its Wednesday meeting.

Counselors consistently requested increased mental health support and accessibility throughout the school year. The board unanimously approved a resolution last week that would provide mental health training to professors and instructors and facilitate the sharing of mental health resources.

The proposed committee would likely include a group of students who would provide input to Stanford on mental health, according to the GSC adviser and fourth-year PhD in Developmental Sciences and Psychology. student Emily Schell.

GSC Advisor and Fifth-Year Ph.D. in Modern Thought and Literature. Student Jamie Fine has voiced her support for committee work starting over the summer, saying the summer term can be a “dead zone” for students, making student initiatives difficult to launch in the fall.

“It would be really nice to enter the university year with conversations [around mental health] lined up, Fine said.

Advisors also made plans for Grad Formal, an annual social event for grad students. The event will take place on Friday and will be held at Coyote Ranch in Coyote, Calif., according to GSC Co-Chair KC Shah JD ’22.

The board also on Wednesday approved funding for several events organized by student groups, including Lighthouse for Ukraine, a global event that has been staged in several other cities, including Berlin and London. The event will be organized by the Ukrainian Students’ Association (UKA), which collaborated with the Russian-Speaking Students’ Association to receive funding, as the UKA is not an official student organization.

According to the fourth year Ph.D. in Physics. Student and UKA Fellow Kateryna Pistunova, the event will feature Ukrainian cooking, art and masterclasses, as well as several prominent guest speakers and Ukrainian organizations. All funds raised at the event would be donated to Ukraine, Pistunova said.

Other events that received funding included a Cinco de Mayo celebration hosted by the Mexican Association of Graduate Students. The Stanford Italian Society also received Italian food and beverage funding for a larger barbecue event called Fire on Fire, which features outdoor kitchens from countries around the world.

]]>
Fayetteville State University receives $2.3 million to advance STEM initiatives https://h-fan.net/fayetteville-state-university-receives-2-3-million-to-advance-stem-initiatives/ Sun, 01 May 2022 21:33:23 +0000 https://h-fan.net/fayetteville-state-university-receives-2-3-million-to-advance-stem-initiatives/ HHistorically, black colleges and universities across the country have used the power of education as a means to advance diversity in STEM. Fayetteville State University was reward a multi-million dollar endowment from the National Institutes of Health to support scholars pursuing studies in science, technology, engineering and math. The $2.3 million grant will be used […]]]>

HHistorically, black colleges and universities across the country have used the power of education as a means to advance diversity in STEM. Fayetteville State University was reward a multi-million dollar endowment from the National Institutes of Health to support scholars pursuing studies in science, technology, engineering and math.

The $2.3 million grant will be used to create scholarships for students from underserved communities. The funds will help cultivate the Undergraduate Research Training for Student Enhancement (U-RISE) Initiative, which was launched to align scholars from historically disenfranchised groups with the resources needed to thrive in the world. university and enter a doctorate based on biomedical research. programs.

The NIH grant was awarded to Dr. James E. Raynor Jr. who is a professor in the institution’s Department of Biological and Forensic Sciences. Under Dr. Raynor’s leadership, the school’s former initiative, FSU-RISE, has supported more than 300 disadvantaged students, many of whom have transitioned into prestigious medical programs at schools like Johns Hopkins University, ‘Cornell University and Harvard University.

Dr. Monica Leach, the institution’s provost and senior vice chancellor for academic affairs, says the endowment will level the playing field in STEM through access and education. “FSU has worked hard to ensure students have access to everything they need to succeed,” Dr. Leach said in a statement. “Whether it’s reducing tuition fees or redesigning our organizational structure to better serve students, we believe in keeping the best interests of our students at the heart of what we do. This grant helps us take another step toward unfettered access to fields of study that have historically been inaccessible to students from underrepresented communities. We are excited about the promise that U-RISE holds for FSU students.

Many HBCUs have received grants to elevate their STEM education-centric programs. In February, North Carolina-based Livingstone College received a $2.24 million endowment from the National Science Foundation.

SEE ALSO:

North Carolina HBCU receives $2 million to advance STEM education initiatives

United Negro College Fund Launches HBCUv Platform to Advance Digital Learning and Cultivate Community

10 photographs

]]>
Governor Lamont applauds final passage of climate legislation that includes new emissions standards for medium and heavy-duty vehicles https://h-fan.net/governor-lamont-applauds-final-passage-of-climate-legislation-that-includes-new-emissions-standards-for-medium-and-heavy-duty-vehicles/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 23:53:55 +0000 https://h-fan.net/governor-lamont-applauds-final-passage-of-climate-legislation-that-includes-new-emissions-standards-for-medium-and-heavy-duty-vehicles/ Press Releases 04/29/2022 Governor Lamont applauds final passage of climate legislation that includes new emissions standards for medium and heavy-duty vehicles (HARTFORD, CT) – Governor Ned Lamont applauds the Connecticut House of Representatives for giving final approval today to the legislation (Senate Bill 4) that includes his proposal to adopt emissions standards for California for […]]]>

Press Releases

04/29/2022

Governor Lamont applauds final passage of climate legislation that includes new emissions standards for medium and heavy-duty vehicles

(HARTFORD, CT) – Governor Ned Lamont applauds the Connecticut House of Representatives for giving final approval today to the legislation (Senate Bill 4) that includes his proposal to adopt emissions standards for California for medium and heavy vehicles, which will help improve air quality and health outcomes for Connecticut residents.

Several states neighboring Connecticut have already adopted similar emissions standards, including Massachusetts, New York and New Jersey. These standards will ensure that manufacturers produce cleaner vehicles and offer them for sale in Connecticut, giving potential consumers more options while reducing a major source of air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. greenhouse in the state.

The legislation also makes various legislative changes under the Connecticut Clean Air Act and establishes several new programs and initiatives regarding the use of electric vehicles and improving air quality by reducing related greenhouse gas emissions. to transportation.

“The choice is clear, passing the California framework and the other major initiatives in this bill will be another important step toward cleaner air and better health outcomes for all residents, especially those who live in our cities and along our transportation corridors, and also gets us back in the right direction on our greenhouse gas emission reduction targets, Governor Lamont said. “I commend the Senate Chairs of the Environment Committee and the Transportation Committee, Senator Cohen and Senator Haskell, respectively, for their efforts to guide this bill, as well as their counterparts in the House, the representative Gresko and representative Lemar. I look forward to signing this important bill.

“Today’s vote was a victory for the people of Connecticut – all of us,” Department of Energy and Environmental Protection Commissioner Katie Dykes said. “This legislation will mean cleaner air, better health outcomes and reductions in our greenhouse gas emissions; provide residents and businesses with cleaner vehicle options; making it easier for residents to buy and charge an electric vehicle, especially those in environmental justice communities who bear the worst air pollution loads; and more. This was one of the most important legislative sessions for clean air and climate action in Connecticut history – Senate Bill 4 will guarantee Connecticut residents and businesses access to e-bikes , clean and affordable passenger vehicles, trucks, school buses and transit buses, and the passage of Senate Bill 10 and Senate Bill 176 ensures that these vehicles will be powered by a clean and reliable electricity. I applaud all of our legislative partners and advocates for their efforts to defend this impactful legislation.

The transport sector is responsible for 67% of emissions of nitrogen oxides, a key component of smog. Medium and heavy vehicles – which include trucks, buses and small delivery vehicles – account for up to 53% of nitrogen oxide emissions, although they only represent 6% of the on-road vehicle fleet. The transportation sector is also the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions statewide, at 37%, and as revealed by the latest inventory of greenhouse gas emissions from the Ministry of Energy and Environmental Protection, emissions from this sector are increasing, while they should decrease by about a third. in this decade if the State wants to reach its goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions for 2030. Medium and heavy vehicles are responsible for 25% of greenhouse gas emissions from the transport sector.

Twitter: @GouvNedLamont

Facebook: Office of Governor Ned Lamont


]]>
Wellness Strategies Can Boost Resilience https://h-fan.net/wellness-strategies-can-boost-resilience/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 13:48:29 +0000 https://h-fan.net/wellness-strategies-can-boost-resilience/ Beth Cabrera shared her expertise on positivity with tech students as a guest presenter in a five-week course called Resilience Building Strategies: Growing Through What We Are Going Through. mental health issues.” title=”Beth Cabrera is encouraged to see that society is more sensitive than ever to mental health issues.” loading=”lazy” typeof=”foaf:Image”/> Beth Cabrera is encouraged […]]]>

Beth Cabrera shared her expertise on positivity with tech students as a guest presenter in a five-week course called Resilience Building Strategies: Growing Through What We Are Going Through.

mental health issues.” title=”Beth Cabrera is encouraged to see that society is more sensitive than ever to mental health issues.” loading=”lazy” typeof=”foaf:Image”/>

Beth Cabrera is encouraged to see that society is more sensitive than ever to mental health issues.

Beth Cabrera, the first lady of Georgia Tech, is a psychologist and Tech graduate (MS PSY 1993, Ph.D. PSY 1995). His research focuses on the power of positive psychology to achieve greater success and well-being. For the past few years, she’s been sharing her expertise on positivity with tech students as a guest speaker in a five-week course called “Resilience Building Strategies: Growing Through What We Are Going Through.” It was developed in 2019 by Sonia Alvarez-Robinson, executive director of Georgia Tech Strategic Consulting, and Joi Alexander, director of Health Initiatives.

“Social support is the number one factor in well-being,” Cabrera said. “We need people. It’s an evolutionary thing, because in the days of the cavemen, if you didn’t have your tribe to help keep you safe, you died. You couldn’t survive. only.

Today, due to physical distancing in work and social environments caused by the pandemic, many people are less connected to others.

“Some people feel like they’re connected because they use social media, but it’s not the same kind of connection,” she said. “We are less connected to our communities. We are not as involved in our churches or different associations. During the pandemic, physical distancing was important, but not social distancing.

Cabrera said having a positive attitude and experiencing happiness are also important for well-being. But she said “being happy” shouldn’t be the goal.

“There’s a difference between doing things that make you feel positive emotions and aiming to be happy,” she said. “Being happy all the time is never going to happen, so if you set a goal to be happy, you will always fail.”

Instead, Cabrera suggests engaging in activities that make you happy. It could be anything from reading to exercising to hanging out with friends. The result will be a feeling of happiness that can be repeated as needed.

Positive psychology does not mean that you deny your negative feelings. “Positive psychology recognizes first and foremost that we are human and that humans are going to experience a wide range of emotions,” she said. “It’s very important to accept all of your emotions, good and bad. We know that if you try to ignore or suppress any of these negative emotions, they just get stronger.

Cabrera is encouraged to see that society is more sensitive than ever to mental health issues.

“I started talking to companies in 2004 about employee well-being, telling them that it was actually linked to performance. Happy employees will be smarter, more creative and they will work better together, she said. “Today there is an increased awareness of the importance of mental health and the need to help people deal with these issues.”

Alvarez-Robinson said, “Having Dr. Cabrera join our class has been a highlight of the student experience since we started the class in 2019. We recognized that our students needed additional skills to navigate the change, challenges and uncertainty. We offered it as part of the mini-mester pilot program and the first cohort launched in spring 2020.”

The one-credit course will be offered again in the fall and is listed as Resilience Building Strategies 4801/8801 (cross-list for undergraduate and graduate students).

A recording of Cabrera’s most recent workshop, as well as other related sessions, is available on the Georgia Tech Resilience ERG website.

]]>
CT must protect the mental health of young people with these two bills https://h-fan.net/ct-must-protect-the-mental-health-of-young-people-with-these-two-bills/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 04:01:00 +0000 https://h-fan.net/ct-must-protect-the-mental-health-of-young-people-with-these-two-bills/ As students at Yale, we saw many of our friends go through mental health crises. This is nothing new for us: a huge 49.5% of adolescents have mental health problemseven before the COVID-19 pandemic. As teenagers ourselves, we have experienced first-hand a mental health system in disarray, where those who need help the most are […]]]>

As students at Yale, we saw many of our friends go through mental health crises. This is nothing new for us: a huge 49.5% of adolescents have mental health problemseven before the COVID-19 pandemic.

As teenagers ourselves, we have experienced first-hand a mental health system in disarray, where those who need help the most are ignored. In most cases, the amount of mental health resources and funding deemed “adequate” falls far short of what is needed.

]]>