Health Initiatives – H Fan http://h-fan.net/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 06:12:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://h-fan.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2-150x150.png Health Initiatives – H Fan http://h-fan.net/ 32 32 80% of pregnancy-related deaths in the United States are preventable https://h-fan.net/80-of-pregnancy-related-deaths-in-the-united-states-are-preventable/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 23:18:12 +0000 https://h-fan.net/80-of-pregnancy-related-deaths-in-the-united-states-are-preventable/ According to a new CDC report, four out of five deaths that occur during pregnancy or within a year of childbirth could have been prevented. The United States has one of the highest maternal mortality rates among high-income countries. More than half of the deaths occurred up to a year after childbirth. The vast majority […]]]>

  • According to a new CDC report, four out of five deaths that occur during pregnancy or within a year of childbirth could have been prevented.
  • The United States has one of the highest maternal mortality rates among high-income countries.
  • More than half of the deaths occurred up to a year after childbirth.

The vast majority of pregnancy-related deaths in the United States are preventable, according to a new report from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Four out of five deaths occurring during pregnancy or in the year following childbirth could have been avoided if measures had been taken to improve and expand access to health care.

The United States has one of the highest maternal mortality rates among high-income countries, and the number of maternal deaths has increased dramatically during the pandemic, especially among black and Indigenous people.

Dr. Amy Roskin, board-certified OB/GYN and chief medical officer of Seven Starling, a perinatal mental health platform, says the results are shocking and show there is a clear need for those responsible for health are making structural changes in the way health care is delivered in order to prevent these deaths.

“It shows all the work we need to do to prevent these deaths. The CDC report underscores the need for systemic change in how we manage care before, during, and after pregnancy,” Roskin told Healthline.

Researchers assessed health data from 1,018 pregnancy-related deaths that occurred in 36 states between 2017 and 2019.

A preventable cause was identified in 839, or 84%, of the deaths. More than half of the deaths occurred up to a year after childbirth.

The most common causes of death were mental health issues (including suicide and substance abuse). Hemorrhages, heart problems, infections and thrombotic embolisms were also largely responsible for the deaths.

The leading causes of death vary by race and ethnicity, according to the report.

Heart and coronary heart disease were the leading causes of death among blacks, mental health problems were the leading causes of death among Hispanics and whites, and hemorrhage was the leading cause of death among Asians.

Due to the small population size, the leading cause of death has not been identified among Native Americans or Alaska Natives. Another one exam of the CDC, however, found that mental health problems and hemorrhage were the leading causes of pregnancy-related death in these population groups.

The researchers say their findings highlight the need to develop healthcare initiatives to ensure that all pregnant and postpartum patients receive the care they need. The findings should also help future research uncover ways to address these racial disparities and improve health outcomes for all, Roskin said.

“One of the key takeaways is the critical importance of screening, diagnosis, and treatment for perinatal mental health issues,” Roskin said.

Researchers say it’s crucial that healthcare professionals raise awareness that pregnancy-related deaths can occur months after delivery.

Providers should also be sure to ask all their patients if they have recently given birth to better screen for conditions they are at risk of developing.

“Often people go through a lot of stress and lack of support, which can lead to some of the preventable deaths seen after pregnancy. There is a lack of consistent resources and support in place to screen, diagnose and manage people during and after pregnancy,” Roskin said.

Tim Bruckner, associate professor of public health at the University of California, Irvine, says that while the causes of these deaths are multifaceted and complex, new initiatives can help improve outcomes over time.

Health officials should work to expand access to health insurance and improve coverage for prenatal and follow-up care, the report said.

Minimizing barriers to care, such as cost and transportation, can also help improve health outcomes for pregnant and postpartum women.

According to Bruckner, California health officials have already taken several steps to improve outcomes for pregnant women. They now use public health surveillance data to inform clinical change and partner with the private and public health sectors to develop improvement projects aimed at preventing pregnancy-related deaths.

More research is needed to understand how clinical and public health interventions for mothers can help prevent self-harm and substance use disorders, Bruckner added.

“Pregnancy-related deaths in the United States are unacceptably high, especially compared to other high-income countries,” Bruckner said.

According to a new CDC report, four out of five pregnancy-related deaths in the United States are preventable. The most common causes of maternal death are mental health issues, heart disease, infection and hemorrhage. The findings underscore the need to improve access to health insurance and health care so that pregnant women receive the care they need during and after childbirth.

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A New Age of Work – Harvard Gazette https://h-fan.net/a-new-age-of-work-harvard-gazette/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 13:55:41 +0000 https://h-fan.net/a-new-age-of-work-harvard-gazette/ Traditional ideas about where and how we work are being reconsidered nationwide, and no group of employees is more in the grip of change than human resources departments. In its first year under Manuel Cuevas-Trisán, Harvard Human Resources is considering new policies and initiatives to adapt to changes in the workplace, including retention and recruiting […]]]>

Traditional ideas about where and how we work are being reconsidered nationwide, and no group of employees is more in the grip of change than human resources departments. In its first year under Manuel Cuevas-Trisán, Harvard Human Resources is considering new policies and initiatives to adapt to changes in the workplace, including retention and recruiting challenges in an environment remote work. The Gazette spoke with Cuevas-Trisán to get his thoughts on initiatives to address employee burnout, recruiting, and the challenge of providing general direction to a decentralized campus community.

GAZETTE: Over the summer, HHR introduced new dynamic work guidelines for Harvard staff. If you could just talk about what they are and why they are important?

MANUEL CUEVAS-TRISAN: The work that led to the Dynamic Work Guidelines for Harvard Staff actually began before I even started at Harvard, shortly after the shift to remote work due to COVID. The Guiding Principles are an attempt to articulate – although I don’t particularly like the phrase – what the “future of work” at Harvard will look like. We have intentionally framed our perspective with principles, rather than an overly prescriptive policy lens, and our focus areas are:

  • Dynamic and scalable workstation
  • Intentional presence
  • Performance based on results
  • Equity
  • Flexibility
  • Welfare

Looking back to March 2020, employers had no choice but to provide remote options to continue operating in a pandemic environment. Today, as we emerge from the pandemic with more knowledge and experience, we have choices about how we build on the two years of work habits that have changed during this time. A statement of principles provides schools and units with a flexible framework that takes into account the different ways in which our staff provide support and services and accommodates the differences in cultures and operations of each of our schools. The Guiding Principles also recognize that we are operating in a highly competitive talent market and that the concepts of work, worker and workplace have evolved after 2.5 years of collective experience working remotely.

This recognition must be balanced by the fact that Harvard is a residential campus teeming with intellectual dynamism, research, teaching, learning and discovery. It is also an integral part of the economic and cultural fabric of Cambridge and Greater Boston. Coming together to learn, research and collaborate, as well as to support the communities in which we operate, is in the DNA of the Harvard experience. We want to balance that reality with the fact that this is also a 21st century workplace that must compete for talent that demands a greater sense of agency in the way they work. The institutional position in the Guiding Principles makes us more competitive and attractive as an employer, without sacrificing our core identity as a residential campus.

GAZETTE: Given the differences in size, operation and culture between schools, how did you develop principles that apply across the whole school? It is evident that the pandemic has brought about a drastic change in the workforce in terms of remote working. How has this reality been taken into account in these initiatives?

CUEVAS-TRISAN: Consider what has happened since March 2020: a vast majority of the workforce (ours and across all sectors of the economy) is working entirely remotely or on a hybrid basis. Our habits have changed and our expectations have changed. We have tried to determine which new habits can be integrated into the way we collaborate, which can be changed and which are incompatible with our mission. The question then is: how are we going to do this in a way that allows Harvard to leverage the best of the hybrid and remote work experience, but also preserve and enhance the value of a residential experience. on the campus ?

Harvard Human Resources has worked closely with Trustees, with employees who have contributed along the way, with University Academic Leaders, with the Academic Council, and with the Board of Trustees to ensure ensure that the guiding principles reflect the perspectives of the whole community. I think the community at large and certainly the leadership of the University has agreed that operating from a set of principles allows us to establish minimum standards around which every school and unit can rally. Within these broad principles, each can adapt and operate with the autonomy to which they are accustomed and in a manner that takes into account the uniqueness of their respective workforces.

GAZETTE: During the pandemic, there has been much concern about burnout and the phenomenon of burnout. How does HRH recognize and combat rising burnout?

CUEVAS-TRISAN: Burnout is a real phenomenon. It was experienced in American workplaces before the pandemic and was exacerbated by the uncertainties – economic, public health, personal isolation, among other disruptions – of the pandemic. We reviewed our own data indicators on burnout and, with the support of senior academic and administrative leaders, we launched the Recharge Harvard campaign. It may sound like something only associated with vacation usage, but everything we do in the area of ​​benefits is aimed at achieving a more optimal integration between our work and your personal life. It is also about recognizing that burnout is not about isolated individual factors, but rather about the organizational context and support systems for individual members of our community. As such, Recharge Harvard is a first step to encourage a culture of well-being by setting a different tone, to change the habit of treating all work with the same urgency. Remember that we have been operating in “crisis mode” for over two years. Recharge Harvard seeks to establish a different tone from the top. This encourages leaders and their teams to distinguish what is mission critical from what may be important but can and should wait. It provides a structure for collaborating in organizing, designing, and performing tasks in a way that helps each of us stay energized with our work, increase our sense of effectiveness, and enjoy the time we have. won.

GAZETTE: HHR has just announced an extension of what could be described as “inclusive benefits”. What was the motivation behind these updates?

CUEVAS-TRISAN: Harvard already has a strong benefits infrastructure for all of our staff, from support and total rewards to medical, educational and professional development benefits. But we have actively monitored the benefits market, benchmarked other institutions, and listened to our staff and faculty – primarily, but not exclusively, through various affinity groups. Through this process of analysis and active listening, we have identified opportunities to improve the design and coverage of our benefits with a lens of diversity, equity, inclusion and belonging.

In early July, we announced the expansion of our child care bursary programs. The change expands the range of eligibility criteria based on income and we have increased the cap so that more people can access these programs. As part of this improvement, we have increased the funding provided by the University to reimburse child care expenses.

For the 2023 benefit year, we are also adding hair transplantation and electrolysis to the range of existing medical benefits. I believe these enhancements reflect a commitment to include all families and identities, and a step forward in promoting and continuing to invest in our diverse workforce.

We are pleased to announce that the benefits for adopting a second parent include stepparents. Married employees, regardless of sex or gender identity, can now enroll in the legal adoption program for their partner’s child. This change is particularly important for LGBTQ+ couples but benefits all in-laws. And we’re enhancing our infertility benefits to remove barriers for same-sex partners and single women.

GAZETTE: Reflect on your time here at Harvard, now that you have held this position for over a year. As you look to the future, nothing else on the horizon?

CUEVAS-TRISAN: Well, it’s been a very intense first year and I feel like I’m still moving up my “Harvard learning curve”. My team and I are committed to making Harvard the best and most attractive talent platform for our current and future workforce. We have a lot to offer as an employer, but we also have opportunities for improvement, including how we communicate the value of working at Harvard. I view Harvard’s staff and their extraordinary array of talents, the quality of our workforce, as a great source of wealth for the University. But talent must be cultivated, developed and shared.

Going forward, you can expect enhanced professional development programs for our employees through our Workplace Development Center, an increased focus on diversifying our talent pools, a continued focus on promoting mental health for our workforce, thoughtful use of workforce data to improve our investment in our people and expanding collaborations with key partners such as OEDIB, Deans of human resources of each of the schools, HUHS and our different identity affinity groups.

From where I sit, there has never been a more exciting time to be in higher education, especially as a human resources leader. For the future, optimism is the key word for me.

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A mental health overhaul is underway in rural Minnesota – Duluth News Tribune https://h-fan.net/a-mental-health-overhaul-is-underway-in-rural-minnesota-duluth-news-tribune/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 15:00:00 +0000 https://h-fan.net/a-mental-health-overhaul-is-underway-in-rural-minnesota-duluth-news-tribune/ WADENA, Minn. – It is hoped that the move to more proactive programming will reverse the trend of mental health issues plaguing several rural counties in central Minnesota. Wadena County Director of Human Services, Jennifer Westrum, offered several items to Wadena County Commissioners on August 16, all committed to being proactive rather than reactive to […]]]>

WADENA, Minn. – It is hoped that the move to more proactive programming will reverse the trend of mental health issues plaguing several rural counties in central Minnesota.

Wadena County Director of Human Services, Jennifer Westrum, offered several items to Wadena County Commissioners on August 16, all committed to being proactive rather than reactive to situations that continue to arise with mental health.

Top of the list was the recent decision to hire a mental health coordinator who will work in Wadena, Crow Wing, Morrison and Todd counties to help identify initiatives to lift the region out of this crisis. Based on the Greater State of Mind 2021 project assembled by the 5+ Region Mental Health Initiative, this is a needed position that will focus on expanding the availability of mental health resources for residents. The coordinator will be an employee of Sourcewell and will start in late 2022 or early 2023.

Another is the work done by Wadena County Social Service staff, Madi Lausten and Carlie Reading, for at-risk youth in the county. They secured funding for the program through the Family Services Collaborative to deliver a five-week youth-focused life skills program. There were nine young people from across the county who participated in the initial programming and about five who were able to attend regularly. Lausten said part of it has to do with transportation.

The LIFE 101 program provides education and support to at-risk youth while simultaneously utilizing local resources and connecting youth with community partners. The LIFE 101 program aims to help young people develop independent living skills, which is an evidence-based intervention supported by national and local child welfare initiatives. Providing young people with independent living skills helps promote success in adulthood and prepares them for life’s challenges, thereby reducing the likelihood that young people will encounter difficulties in the future. The hope is that young people will need less access to ‘rescue services’ in the future, as well as learning to navigate the adult world more effectively.

Jennifer Westrum, director of social services for Wadena County. Photo submitted

“Wadena County Social Services Child Protection and Child Mental Health Teams noticed the need for a local Independent Living Skills (ILS) program for the teens we serve in our area,” according to documents shared by Westrum. “Currently, the closest available ILS program is housed in Brainerd, Minnesota, which is a transportation and logistical barrier for many of the families we serve. By hosting an ILS program in our county, we hope to reach more young people who otherwise might not have the same opportunities to learn independent life skills that will serve them well into adulthood.

The program aims to help young people learn how to build healthy relationships, adopt a healthy lifestyle, learn to protect themselves and successfully navigate the nuances of the adult world. This program has funding for three additional rounds and can take up to 16 per round.

Lack of staff, lack of beds

One area that has no immediate remedy is the county paying for the use of a bed at a child and adolescent behavioral health hospital when the patient does not meet the criteria for the hospital’s funding. State pays for his stay there. Normally, the person would be moved to a site requiring less acute services at a much lower cost. But staffing shortages have limited bed availability.

“There just aren’t any beds to get this kid out of,” Westrum said.

In this situation, the county ran into issues where the costs start accumulating very quickly when the bed costs more than $2,000 a day for an individual to stay in. Westrum said several local staff and one of the cities have undertaken a nationwide search for beds in 35 states that could accommodate this person, keeping in mind that they need to be visited regularly by county staff, they don’t therefore may not be too far out of reach or it may create another excessive cost. No beds could be found.

Before the pandemic, it was difficult to transfer residents from one level of care to another. Since the start of the pandemic, it has become almost impossible to find a suitable place to hang out. This is due to either a staff shortage or an absence of staff due to illness.

In these cases, the patient no longer needs the same level of acute care that put them to bed, but they still need somewhere to go before being sent home.

“I think we did everything in our power to get them to a lower level of care,” Westrum said. “Once moved into a group home, the county would no longer pay for it.”

At the time of the encounter, the person had been receiving care for 20 days at the rate of approximately $2,400 per day. This is a cost charged to Wadena County, and a cost that no one budgets or can plan for.
What would help reduce the need for these types of circumstances, according to the leaders, is more work done in the homes of the mentally ill.

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Good Life Center offers yoga programs for students  https://h-fan.net/good-life-center-offers-yoga-programs-for-students-%ef%bf%bc/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 05:21:56 +0000 https://h-fan.net/good-life-center-offers-yoga-programs-for-students-%ef%bf%bc/ The Good Life Center hopes to promote mental health and wellness on campus through yoga programs. Abel Geleta 1:20 a.m., Sep 16, 2022 Collaborating journalist Yale Daily News The Good Life Center at Yale offers a variety of yoga practice sessions in hopes of promoting mental health and well-being on campus. Although yoga is not […]]]>

The Good Life Center hopes to promote mental health and wellness on campus through yoga programs.

Abel Geleta

1:20 a.m., Sep 16, 2022

Collaborating journalist


Yale Daily News

The Good Life Center at Yale offers a variety of yoga practice sessions in hopes of promoting mental health and well-being on campus.

Although yoga is not commonly associated with mental health efforts on college campuses, it can be used to alleviate the stress and anxiety induced by a rigorous academic environment. The Good Life Center offers programming around the practice of yoga to the university community in collaboration with different organizations and individuals.

“We have found that the dedicated mindfulness workshops and yoga classes have been a popular attraction for students, and we have seen high interest and participation in our classes,” said Corinne Coia, acting director of the Good Life Center and Community Wellness Specialist at Yale College. Community care.

On campus, the increased demand for yoga classes and workshops indicates a revival in the use of this ancient practice to manage the stresses of everyday life. The Schwarzman Center location of the Good Life Center, a branch of the original center at Silliman College, opened its doors to the entire Yale community nearly a year ago. Some of the Center’s expanded initiatives include “Take it Easy Tuesday” and “Wellness Wednesday,” according to Coia.

“We are currently running several mindfulness workshops, including walk-in mindfulness sessions, Koru mindfulness classes, and initiatives like our 6-week ‘Heart Opening Practice Series’,” wrote Coia in an email to the News. “Our goal is to teach students the science behind mindfulness and ways to incorporate this practice into their daily lives.”

Expressing his excitement for expanding the practice of yoga through the Good Life Center, Coia noted his past experience as a “restorative yoga instructor” and highlighted its benefits for students, especially when they are tackling a “turbulent semester”.

Lulu Zhang LAW ’23, Certified Yoga Instructor and Yoga Teacher at Good Life Center, highlighted the many benefits of practicing yoga, including improved strength, flexibility, balance, posture , sleep quality and stress management.

Zhang also expressed his gratitude for the Center’s existence on campus and the way it openly promotes and advocates for student mental health and well-being.

“I think the [mere] the fact that the center exists and they talk about the importance of wellness is huge,” Zhang said. “I graduated from college in 2016, and there wasn’t as much discussion about wellness and mental health as there is now.”

Giving tips for making these practices a daily habit, Zhang spoke about the importance of integrating yoga into everyday life. She also stressed the importance of prioritizing mental health and well-being as the stresses of college life escalate. “I have to take care of my own health and well-being in order to be the best human being and member of the community,” Zhang said.

Mariama Sow ’25, a student worker at the Good Life Center, reaffirmed the revitalization and increased support of campus mental health and wellness resources.

“I was in shock at how pretty this place is,” exclaimed Sow, referring to the design and layout of the Good Life Center. “I never thought of such a lofty institution to have a space to put personal care first. I feel like the GLC is a place that promotes and does this for students.

Sow praised the Center’s space and offerings for Yale students. For her, the Center is “founded in mood change and upliftment”. As a member of her staff, she has been able to observe the positive impact this space has had on students, and she has stated that students “definitely come out happier than when they came in.”

The Good Life Center is located in the second floor annex at 168 Grove St.

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Water Street Appoints Vice President of Debt Capital Markets https://h-fan.net/water-street-appoints-vice-president-of-debt-capital-markets/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 13:37:00 +0000 https://h-fan.net/water-street-appoints-vice-president-of-debt-capital-markets/ CHICAGO, September 14, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Water Street Healthcare Partners, a strategic investor focused exclusively on the healthcare industry, today announced that it has appointed Ryan Pavlik as Vice President of Debt Capital Markets. Mr. Pavlik is the newest addition to the Water Street team as the company expands its resources to support its growing […]]]>

CHICAGO, September 14, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Water Street Healthcare Partners, a strategic investor focused exclusively on the healthcare industry, today announced that it has appointed Ryan Pavlik as Vice President of Debt Capital Markets. Mr. Pavlik is the newest addition to the Water Street team as the company expands its resources to support its growing group of businesses specializing in healthcare services and technology, medical products and diagnostics, as well as pharmaceuticals and life sciences.

In his newly created role, Mr. Pavlik will develop and support Water Street’s funding strategies for new investment opportunities. He will also work with the Water Street family of healthcare companies on debt financing initiatives that support acquisitions and other initiatives to advance their growth objectives. Mr. Pavlik has focused on debt financings for broadly syndicated and middle-market companies for the past eight years as Vice President of Golub Capital. He began his career in investment banking at PNC Capital Markets.

Max Michkinpartner, Water Street said:

“Ryan’s specialist knowledge and network of relationships within the lending community will greatly assist our partnerships with healthcare companies. As we pursue new investments and work with management teams on strategic acquisitions and initiatives that can benefit from debt financing, Ryan will be an important resource in helping us identify the best lenders and the best financing structures. loans that meet the unique needs and growth objectives of each business. »

About Water Street

Water Street is a strategic investor focused exclusively on healthcare. The company has a strong track record of building market-leading businesses in key healthcare growth sectors. She has worked with some of the world’s largest healthcare companies on her investments, including Johnson & Johnson, Medtronic, Smith & Nephew and Walgreen Co. The Water Street team is comprised of industry leaders and professionals experienced investment professionals with decades of experience investing in and operating global healthcare businesses. The company is headquartered in Chicago. For more information on Water Street, visit waterstreet.com.

SOURCE Water Street Healthcare Partners

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$23.4 million in ARPA funding goes to health, infrastructure and business | New https://h-fan.net/23-4-million-in-arpa-funding-goes-to-health-infrastructure-and-business-new/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 21:30:00 +0000 https://h-fan.net/23-4-million-in-arpa-funding-goes-to-health-infrastructure-and-business-new/ Cleveland County commissioners on Monday unanimously approved nearly $23.4 million in American Rescue Plan Act money in initiatives ranging from infrastructure to health care. While the bulk of the money will be given to initiatives for the first time, three existing initiatives will be bolstered by funds allocated in the second round of funding, according […]]]>

Cleveland County commissioners on Monday unanimously approved nearly $23.4 million in American Rescue Plan Act money in initiatives ranging from infrastructure to health care.

While the bulk of the money will be given to initiatives for the first time, three existing initiatives will be bolstered by funds allocated in the second round of funding, according to the inventory of projects.

The credit comes after commissioners in June earmarked nearly $17 million in ARPA funds for infrastructure, broadband, public health, renovations to the Alan J. Couch Juvenile Detention Center and support for purpose non-profit. Both credits are part of the $55 million the county received under the federal program.

In the second round of funding, the county is authorized to spend:

  • $10.28 million for health initiatives. More than half ($6.28 million) is dedicated to funding the behavioral health and public health of inmates and staff at the Cleveland County Detention Center. The remainder is for county and Normandy regional health system responses to COVID-19, NRHS healthy living initiatives and behavioral health initiatives in the juvenile detention centre.
  • $9.6 million for infrastructure. $5 million goes to the Cleveland County Fairgrounds, which is used for mass vaccination clinics, elections and other services as well as the county fair. $3.5 million will be used to leverage investments from states and/or tribal nations for water infrastructure. The remainder will be used for Lake Thunderbird sustainability and to leverage broadband infrastructure.
  • $3.5 million for business and non-profit initiatives. $2 million will be split between a business incubator “ensuring the county’s economic recovery” and a workforce initiative for the unemployed or underemployed. $1.5 million will go to non-profit organizations.
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European digital health company launches new initiative to help cardiology researchers create more clinical evidence https://h-fan.net/european-digital-health-company-launches-new-initiative-to-help-cardiology-researchers-create-more-clinical-evidence/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 23:25:40 +0000 https://h-fan.net/european-digital-health-company-launches-new-initiative-to-help-cardiology-researchers-create-more-clinical-evidence/ SAN DIEGO (PRWEB) September 10, 2022 Over the past decade, digital health technologies have proliferated in clinical and non-clinical settings. The global digital health market size is expected to reach USD 430.52 billion by 20281. This industry growth has been driven by the continued expansion of digital connectivity, falling cost of sensors and other […]]]>

Over the past decade, digital health technologies have proliferated in clinical and non-clinical settings. The global digital health market size is expected to reach USD 430.52 billion by 20281. This industry growth has been driven by the continued expansion of digital connectivity, falling cost of sensors and other technological components, and an increase in patient engagement. Despite this growth, digital health players lack a comprehensive understanding of the clinical robustness and claims of digital health products and services. A lack of transparency and clinical validation prevents the digital health ecosystem from truly understanding the safety and effectiveness of digital health therapies. Therefore, it is critical that digital health players invest in clinical validation studies that generate high-quality evidence to inform product development and widespread clinical adoption.

As a result, Happitech announced the launch of its FastStart Research app. The Amsterdam-based digital health company designed the app to support researchers and advance the adoption of digital health technology in cardiac practice. The mobile research app uses photoplethysmography (PPG) technology to measure heart rate, heart rate variability, and atrial fibrillation. PPG is a non-invasive optical technique that uses light to detect blood volume changes in the microvasculature. The app can be used with any smartphone that has a camera and flash, making it widely accessible to researchers around the world.

The company offers the app for free to cardiology researchers and can customize features to meet a variety of requirements – getting a project from idea to launch in 2-4 weeks. The app makes it easy to collect data from large numbers of participants that can be downloaded and exported for analysis, giving researchers quick and easy access to the data they need.

We have several research partners, including Mount Sinai, Boston Children’s Hospital, OLVG, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Hartstichting and UMC Utrecht. The technology is also highlighted by the Dutch Heart Association and recommended in the Dutch Cardiology Association screening guidelines.

Dr. David Putrino, PT, PhD – Director of Rehabilitation Innovation, Mount Sinai Health System spoke about working with Happitech: “The team understood our requirements and were able to customize the functionality of the research app to suit our specific needs. It was quick and easy to get started.”

The company hopes that by providing this technology to researchers, it will help remove some of the barriers associated with launching cardiac research initiatives. It is only through such efforts that the digital health industry can live up to its potential as a transformative force in healthcare.

“Happitech is committed to providing researchers with the tools they need to conduct important research. The FastStart Research app is just one example of how we are working to support the cardiac research community,” said Yosef Safi Harb, Founder and CEO of Happitech. “We hope that by partnering with researchers, we can help advance the field of cardiac care and improve patient outcomes around the world. »

Happitech’s PPG technology is CE certified and TGA approved to collect heart rate, heart rate variability, and atrial fibrillation measurements, all through the flashlight and camera lens of a modern smartphone. We have several research partners, including OLVG, Mount Sinai, Boston Children’s Hospital, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Hartstichting and UMC Utrecht. The technology is also highlighted by the Dutch Heart Association and recommended in the Dutch Cardiology Association screening guidelines.

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Suicide prevention in the LGBTQ+ community requires addressing stigma, valuing everyone equally https://h-fan.net/suicide-prevention-in-the-lgbtq-community-requires-addressing-stigma-valuing-everyone-equally/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 05:20:01 +0000 https://h-fan.net/suicide-prevention-in-the-lgbtq-community-requires-addressing-stigma-valuing-everyone-equally/ The LGBTQI+ community is vulnerable to suicide; it is a reality that we all need to wake up to and respond to. General suicide prevention programs in the community will not work, because most of them are designed by imagining a cis-heterosexual person as a target. It won’t take into account the stress a person […]]]>

The LGBTQI+ community is vulnerable to suicide; it is a reality that we all need to wake up to and respond to. General suicide prevention programs in the community will not work, because most of them are designed by imagining a cis-heterosexual person as a target. It won’t take into account the stress a person in the community experiences just because they are who they are. Or maybe who they’re not for.

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A response to suicides in the LGBTQI+ community requires a commitment to understanding the social factors that drive people to suicide. That doesn’t mean that strange people may not suffer from mental health issues like depression, anxiety etc This means that hatred, discrimination and isolation can lead to a sense of hopelessness and helplessness where death feels like a release from an impossible life. This lack of hope is due to social reasons. You can’t work with trauma and mental illness without looking at what’s causing it. For example, suicide prevention programs/initiatives for queer community should include an understanding of these structural and systemic factors.

Cases of queer/trans people dying by suicide are an issue of preventable and premature deaths. They are lives that end because individuals are denied the conditions necessary for human beings to create livable lives. These are not intrinsic human vulnerabilities; they are vulnerabilities produced by social and political inequalities. The absence of social structures that could provide conditions for habitability contributes to what researcher Lauren Berlant calls “slow death”. According to Berlant, some populations are marked for being depleted by structural and governmental factors, and queer/trans lives fit that description. Suicide then becomes something that only ends or escapes slow death.

When we understand the social context in which LGBTQI+ suicides occur, we begin to realize that it is society’s responsibility to provide living conditions. Social, political and legal infrastructure and support systems are essential conditions. While LGBTQI+ positive mental health services are needed, we also need to build this infrastructure in order to queer and trans people live a life, survive and thrive. Currently, the social, political, and legal infrastructure extends primarily to cisgender, heterosexual men or women who fit society’s ideas of what is “normal” gender and sexuality. Those who do not return are expelled. This often pushes them to commit suicide to escape the hostility and stigma of society. In our current social configuration, some lives are not considered worthy of mourning. Some bodies don’t matter. The way society conveys this is by not viewing these lives as distressing. This means there were lives that weren’t deemed important enough to even be mourned by death, let alone receive support to live on.

Therapeutic suicidality support will involve providing trauma and crisis care informed by an understanding of the context of stressors in LGBTQI+ lives. Hostility from families, medical and legal institutions, discrimination at work, difficulties in finding safe shelter are all challenges that have a negative impact on mental health. A context of deprivation and discrimination shapes the emotional experience of people in the community and impacts how difficult it is for them to imagine the possibilities of a safe and fulfilling life. Otherwise, suicide prevention working with the trans community should involve providing services that allow them to experience their true gender. This would include affordable quality medical services, support for changing documents, redress mechanisms for violence and discrimination, as well as housing and employment. Thus, suicide prevention is not just about mental health services, but about providing services that support individuals to experience their gender authentically.

With the LGBTQI+ community, it is important to understand that suicide prevention cannot take the form of a purely therapy-oriented mental health intervention, although it can be a tremendous form of support. If a trans woman cannot afford surgery to live her gender, therapy will not compensate for the absence of this affirmation procedure. The question to ask is this: “What will help this person to imagine a future in this heteronormative world?

Suicide prevention work with the community will need to take an approach that recognizes how some lives are forced to end with a complete lack of opportunities to build a life they can live without discrimination. Thus, suicides of LGBTQI+ people must be considered a social problem and reframed as preventable and premature deaths. This means that if society provided the necessary conditions, infrastructure and support, the number of suicide deaths would decrease. Thus, suicide prevention work must go beyond focusing on the individual alone and focus on systemic change. When societal stigma decreases, when all people are valued equally, when services, policies, laws and infrastructure are inclusive of everyone, then we can truly achieve suicide prevention in the LGBTQI+ community.

(The author is a professor in the Queer Affirmative Counseling Practice course and has co-authored ‘Queer Affirmative Counseling Practice (QACP): A Resource Book for Mental Health Practitioners in India’. She is also a consultant therapist for Mariwala Health Initiative.)

If you feel suicidal or are having suicidal thoughts, help is available – please contact Sneha Suicide Prevention Helpline – 044 -2464000 (24 hours)

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No additional funding for COVID-19 initiatives in schools this year: NB Deputy Minister of Education – New Brunswick https://h-fan.net/no-additional-funding-for-covid-19-initiatives-in-schools-this-year-nb-deputy-minister-of-education-new-brunswick/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 21:28:28 +0000 https://h-fan.net/no-additional-funding-for-covid-19-initiatives-in-schools-this-year-nb-deputy-minister-of-education-new-brunswick/ New Brunswick’s Deputy Minister of Education and Early Childhood Development told the public accounts committee on Tuesday that there is no budget for COVID-19 initiatives for this school year. On Tuesday, Liberal MP and education critic Benoit Bourque asked Deputy Minister George Daley if he was prepared for the waves of COVID-19, the World Health […]]]>

New Brunswick’s Deputy Minister of Education and Early Childhood Development told the public accounts committee on Tuesday that there is no budget for COVID-19 initiatives for this school year.

On Tuesday, Liberal MP and education critic Benoit Bourque asked Deputy Minister George Daley if he was prepared for the waves of COVID-19, the World Health Organization and the best doctor in the country. warned against the coincidence with the return to school.

“We still hear concerns globally, we still hear about additional waves, we still hear about this big wave that could overwhelm us in the fall,” Bourque asked, according to an English translation.

“I would like to know if you have plans in place… what is the current situation you expect and what are your plans in case another wave arrives?”

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COVID 19 – New Brunswick Minister of Education hopes for a normal school year

Daley responded to Bourque by saying, “On a budget approach, we would be back in a regular budget cycle.”

“We would not have sought additional funds for COVID initiatives,” he told the committee.

Daley said the department is working closely with public health on advice and guidance.

“As announced by the government, we are back without any restrictions as we have been since the beginning of March last year,” he said on Tuesday.

Bourque expressed concern that there was no budget for possible COVID-19 measures or mandates in the future given the conversation around the virus.

“I have to admit that I’m a bit surprised to see that the budget is a regular budget, there’s nothing about a new upsurge in the pandemic, and I have to say that surprises me,” Bourque said.


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NB teachers concerned about lack of substitutes ahead of school year


NB teachers concerned about lack of substitutes ahead of school year

He asked the two deputy ministers to reassure that the ministry would be able to deal with a resurgence of COVID-19.

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“These concerns are not unfounded,” Bourque said.

However, fellow deputy minister Marcel Lavoie said the pandemic has taught them that they cannot predict the future.

“In this case, we have a back-to-school season, which is relatively normal,” Lavoie said. “Every time in the past that we have had to add additional measures, we have approached the Treasury Board for additional funds.”

On Wednesday, Education Minister Dominic Cardy told reporters that if public health made a recommendation to reinstate mandatory masks, he would make that change.

The department spent a total of $71.61 million last year on COVID-19 for K-12, early learning facilities, and child care centers.

© 2022 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Egypt steps up green initiatives ahead of COP27 https://h-fan.net/egypt-steps-up-green-initiatives-ahead-of-cop27/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 05:34:50 +0000 https://h-fan.net/egypt-steps-up-green-initiatives-ahead-of-cop27/ CAIRO — Egypt has recently launched a series of environmental campaigns and initiatives as part of its preparations for the 2022 United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP27), which it will host in Sharm el-Sheikh on November 7. On August 20, the Central Administration for Nature Protection, affiliated with the Ministry of the Environment, launched a […]]]>

CAIRO — Egypt has recently launched a series of environmental campaigns and initiatives as part of its preparations for the 2022 United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP27), which it will host in Sharm el-Sheikh on November 7.

On August 20, the Central Administration for Nature Protection, affiliated with the Ministry of the Environment, launched a campaign called “Blue Lagoon”, which aims to raise awareness of the importance of nature reserves and their role in the preservation of natural resources and biodiversity, and the danger of plastic bags on marine animals.

The campaign will be active in the area extending from the Blue Hole region, a Red Sea diving hotspot located a few kilometers north of Dahab in the Sinai Peninsula, to the Ras Abu Gallum protectorate, located between Dahab and Nuweiba.

Since its launch, several Egyptian and foreign volunteers have participated in garbage collection in parts of the Sahel administrative region as part of the campaign.

On August 7, the Egyptian government also announced an initiative to plant 100 million trees. The “green lung” initiative aims to double the share of green space per inhabitant, improve air quality, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, benefit the economy, improve health citizens and to generate economic returns, by planting a variety of trees, including fruit trees such as olive trees, woody trees and ornamental trees.

On July 31, the Ministry of Environment launched another campaign to restore the environment to its original state. The campaign is designed to raise awareness in Egyptian society about climate change issues and encourage people of all age groups to actively participate in protecting the environment from the effects of climate change and to highlight their responsibility and role. important in this problem.

On September 25, 2020, the Ministry of Environment had launched the “Eco Egypt” campaign, which aims to protect nature reserves in Egypt, promote ecotourism and raise awareness among citizens about the importance of preserving biodiversity in the natural reserves.

The recently announced campaigns are all part of the “Go Green” initiative launched on December 29, 2019, under the patronage of President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi. The three-year initiative aims to raise citizens’ awareness of the importance of preserving the environment and natural resources.

Saber Othman, former director of the climate change department at the Egyptian Ministry of Environment and chairman of the board of the Earth’s Climate Foundation for Sustainable Development, told Al-Monitor: “These initiatives are very important because they are diversified and target several social components, as well as tourists interested in visiting nature reserves and similar areas.

He said, “These campaigns and initiatives aim to turn environmental and climate change awareness into real action on the ground, just like the initiative to plant 100 million trees.”

Othman noted: “The Earth’s Climate Foundation for Sustainable Development will participate in this initiative. [to plant 100 million trees] in cooperation with the Ministry of Environment in developing maps to determine the best locations for reforestation in an effort to help overcome the impact of climate change.

He pointed out that determining the best locations to plant trees will help reduce heat islands – areas in cities that experience high temperatures due to several factors. Each tree will have a special code, similar to a birth certificate, which will contain information about the tree, such as its age, type and the amount of CO2 it absorbs, he explained.

Othman added that the diversity of these campaigns will help raise awareness of the importance of climate issues and the need to address them, which will strengthen people’s relationship with green spaces and motivate them to preserve them.

Hossam Muharram, a former adviser to Egypt’s environment minister, told Al-Monitor that the government’s interest in green projects is part of the sustainable development strategy, known as Egypt Vision 2030. , which is seen as an important strategy to overcome the local and global environment. challenges.

He said: “These challenges require concerted efforts to promote the environmental dimension in all areas of development, and to promote cooperation with development partners at local, regional and international levels in the areas of environment and transformation. green, in order to ensure sustainable development and preserve natural resources, and then maintain biodiversity, which is a strategic asset for humanity.

Egyptian efforts in preparation for COP27 are not limited to the local level.

On August 25, Egyptian Foreign Minister Sameh Shoukry met with Danish Climate and Energy Minister Dan Jorgensen. On August 24, Egyptian Minister of Petroleum and Mineral Resources Tarek el-Mulla met with Cypriot Minister of Agriculture, Rural Development and Environment Costas Kadis. Both meetings focused on the latest developments in the preparations for COP27 and the most important topics on the conference agenda.

In turn, Muharram said the recent initiatives launched by the Egyptian government are a symbolic step on the right path to combat climate change and serve sustainable development, especially ahead of COP27.

He noted, however, that tackling climate change requires more effort and greater commitment to reduce its effects.

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