Health Programs – H Fan http://h-fan.net/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 22:13:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://h-fan.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2-150x150.png Health Programs – H Fan http://h-fan.net/ 32 32 The Importance of Tailored Care Management Programs for High-Risk Patients https://h-fan.net/the-importance-of-tailored-care-management-programs-for-high-risk-patients/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 21:23:16 +0000 https://h-fan.net/the-importance-of-tailored-care-management-programs-for-high-risk-patients/ In this episode of Managed Care Cast, we chat with 2 authors of an article that appeared in the September issue of The American Journal of Managed Care®, which focused on the results of their evaluation of an intensive community care management program for individuals with dual high-risk Medicaid ACO-eligible patients. Teams from Mass General […]]]>

In this episode of Managed Care Cast, we chat with 2 authors of an article that appeared in the September issue of The American Journal of Managed Care®, which focused on the results of their evaluation of an intensive community care management program for individuals with dual high-risk Medicaid ACO-eligible patients.

Teams from Mass General Brigham Health System and the Commonwealth Care Alliance, both in Massachusetts, collaborated on a value-based care initiative with the primary goals of improving patient clinical outcomes, reducing unnecessary use of health care and to make care more accessible.

In this episode of Managed Care Cast, we speak with Jack Rowe, MD, MPH, and Lori Tishler, MD, MPH, 2 authors of “Intensive Care Management of a Complex Medicaid Population: A Randomized Evaluation,” published in the September issue of The American Journal of Managed Care®. Their findings on the effectiveness of the iCMP PLUS (Patients Linked to Urgent Support) program show that reaching high-risk patients in their communities with personalized interventions can reduce unnecessary medical expenses and healthcare utilization, as well as the value of partnerships between academic center physicians and community primary care.

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University Programs Concert Series | University of Arkansas https://h-fan.net/university-programs-concert-series-university-of-arkansas/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 05:04:47 +0000 https://h-fan.net/university-programs-concert-series-university-of-arkansas/ University programs Get out there and explore the local music scene during the 2022 University Programs Concert Series featuring local band Honey Collective at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, September 21 at Arkansas Union North Terrace. This free concert is open to the University of Arkansas community. About Honey Collective: Honey […]]]>




University programs

Get out there and explore the local music scene during the 2022 University Programs Concert Series featuring local band Honey Collective at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, September 21 at Arkansas Union North Terrace. This free concert is open to the University of Arkansas community.

About Honey Collective: Honey Collective is known for their unique sound and energizing live performances. Honey Collective infuses future soul, hip-hop and jazz influences to create their own space. The band hails from Arkansas and moved to New York in 2022. They are currently working on new music to be released later this year. Honey Collective is made up of Aricka Lewis (vocals), Jordan Strickland (keyboards, guitar) and Walter Ferguson (drums).

For questions or for accommodation due to a disability, please contact the Office of Student Activities, osa@uark.edu or call 479-575-5255. University programs are a program of the Division of Student Affairs.

About the Student Affairs Division: The Student Affairs Division helps students pursue their education, earn a degree, find meaningful careers, explore diversity, and connect with the global community. We provide students with housing, restaurants, healthcare resources, and create innovative programs that educate and inspire. We’re enhancing the University of Arkansas experience and helping students succeed, one student at a time.

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Recovering addicts work to help others through the “Recovery Project” https://h-fan.net/recovering-addicts-work-to-help-others-through-the-recovery-project/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 11:55:47 +0000 https://h-fan.net/recovering-addicts-work-to-help-others-through-the-recovery-project/ CHESTERFIELD, Virginia. – Wearing a black t-shirt emblazoned with the word ‘PEER’, Joy Bogese approaches people struggling with drug addiction like a teacher would approach a reluctant student – gently, calmly and armed with experience in a subject that has hobbled everyone of them. Bogese, a recovering heroin addict, breaks the ice by telling them […]]]>

CHESTERFIELD, Virginia. – Wearing a black t-shirt emblazoned with the word ‘PEER’, Joy Bogese approaches people struggling with drug addiction like a teacher would approach a reluctant student – gently, calmly and armed with experience in a subject that has hobbled everyone of them.

Bogese, a recovering heroin addict, breaks the ice by telling them a bit about herself.

“I was homeless, I did time in prison. I remember thinking there was no hope. I will always be a junkie,” she told a homeless -shelter by standing next to a uniformed policeman. “I did it and you can too,” she adds quickly.

Bogese is one of four peer recovery specialists working in central Virginia this year as part of “Project Recover.” Specialists are integrated with ambulance crews and police officers so they can offer advice and resources to victims during one of the most difficult times of their lives – immediately following an overdose.

The program began after Courtney Nunnally, a recovering drug addict who founded a nonprofit to help people get into treatment, partnered with the U.S. Attorney’s Office in the Eastern District of Virginia. For its first year, the project received a $302,000 federal grant to hire peer recovery specialists who have turned their lives around after long battles with addiction. Supporters of the program are currently seeking funding for a second year.

Most of the time, Bogese and Nunnally are on patrol with the police in Richmond and Chesterfield. They respond to 911 overdose calls and also patrol areas around abandoned buildings, cheap motels and parking lots, looking for signs of addiction.

On a recent Monday, Bogese spots Adam Hall, a homeless man she first met two weeks earlier, in the parking lot of a closed mall. She and Chesterfield Patrol Officer Travis Adams show up again and ask how he is.

Hall, 49, tells him he was shaken recently after a young man who stayed at the same campsite he lives in died of a drug overdose.

“Have you thought about what we talked about?” Bogese asks, reminding her of some treatment options she suggested when they first met.

“It’s not something I’m passionate about yet, but I’m really thinking about it,” Hall said.

Bogese says she respects his honesty and hands him a nasal spray of naloxone, a prescription drug used to treat opioid overdose emergencies.

“He has these ideas and these options that we talked about, and these seeds are planted,” she says as she walks away.

That day, Adams and Bogese were not called to the scene of any overdoses for several hours on patrol. But they know it probably won’t be long before they do. Like many communities across the country, Chesterfield County has struggled with the crisis of opioid addiction.

In 2021, police responded to 308 calls for overdoses of heroin, fentanyl, or a combination of the two; 77 of those calls were about fatal overdoses. So far this year, they have responded to 161 overdoses; 27 of them were fatal, Lt. Edward Pierpont said.

The use of peer recovery specialists gained popularity in the late 1990s, when the Federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration began funding grant programs specifically focused on support services for peer recovery.

During the opioid crisis of the past decade, peer recovery specialists have become even more prevalent. In 2015, a Massachusetts police chief announced that opiate addicts who come to the police station for help would not be charged with a crime. The Facebook post of former Gloucester Police Chief Leonard Campanello garnered national attention and led to the creation of the Police Assisted Addiction & Recovery Initiative, a non-profit organization that assists law enforcement order to create early diversion and other “no arrest” programs to reduce overdose deaths and expand access. to treatment.

Since its inception seven years ago, the initiative has grown into a national network of nearly 700 police departments in 34 states.

Some departments encourage people to report themselves to police stations, while others, like Project Recover, focus on drug awareness.

“The goal is to get people into a treatment program rather than stopping them to get out of the problem,” said Zoe Grover, executive director of PAARI.

In Berea, Ohio, a town of about 20,000 just outside of Cleveland, the police department created Safe Passages, a program that encourages people to walk through the front door of the police station . There they meet with an agent and then a peer support specialist who helps determine placement for drug rehabilitation or treatment services. The program also helps participants with issues that can often hinder their ability to get treatment, including transportation, insurance, and childcare.

From 2016 to 2020, about 150 people showed up at the police station and asked for help, said Sgt. Patrick Greenhill. Thirteen other police departments in the area also participated, providing services to hundreds more.

“People didn’t believe it at first – that they wouldn’t be arrested – but then people started asking us for help with their friends,” Greenhill said.

In Chesterfield, Adams says having Bogese with him on patrol sometimes alleviates the fear and distrust people struggling with addiction have of the police.

“It’s important for them to be able to see that she’s been through what they have,” he said.

Bogese grew up wanting to be a police officer and earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in criminal justice. But she struggled with alcohol and prescription drugs for two decades, then became addicted to heroin.

After nine months of escalating heroin use, Bogese was arrested, an event she says saved her life. During more than four years in prison, she trained to become a Certified Peer Recovery Specialist and started working for Project Recover in April. She’s been clean for seven years.

“I was so focused on myself before, and the emptiness of feeling, ‘Why am I here? What is my purpose?’” she said. “I (still) have struggles and challenges, but having that sense and purpose to help people gives me that sense of direction so I don’t feel lost.”

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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New program will mentor and train underrepresented students in genomics research https://h-fan.net/new-program-will-mentor-and-train-underrepresented-students-in-genomics-research/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 22:08:37 +0000 https://h-fan.net/new-program-will-mentor-and-train-underrepresented-students-in-genomics-research/ UC Santa Cruz Genomics Institute will partner with California State University, Monterey Bay (CSUMB) and the University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras (UPRRP) campus to mentor and provide a genomics research experience for students from both of these institutions serve Hispanics under a new National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) program. The inaugural program, called […]]]>

UC Santa Cruz Genomics Institute will partner with California State University, Monterey Bay (CSUMB) and the University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras (UPRRP) campus to mentor and provide a genomics research experience for students from both of these institutions serve Hispanics under a new National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) program.

The inaugural program, called Genome Research Experiences to Attract Talented Undergraduates into the Genomics Field to Enhance Diversity (GREAT), was created to provide students from diverse backgrounds with the opportunity to conduct research and receive professional training at leading schools. research intensive.

CSUMB and UPRRP have been selected to receive a total of $3.35 million over five years to support their students’ participation in this program. UC Santa Cruz, which is also a Hispanic-serving institution, is the only university to partner with both funded institutions.

The CSUMB program, under the direction of Associate Professor Nathaniel Jue and Assistant Professor Shahidul Islam, is in exclusive partnership with UCSC and will send approximately six students per year to UC Santa Cruz. Students at UPRRP, where the program will be led by Professor José García-Arrarás, will have the opportunity to conduct research at several other universities, which will include one to two students at UCSC per year.

Visiting students will participate in a paid summer internship program in which they will contribute directly to research in laboratories associated with the UC Santa Cruz Genomics Institute. During the summer term, they will conduct research, build relationships with faculty and staff, explore whether they might want to pursue graduate research at UCSC, learn about science communication, and participate in workshops. career development to prepare for higher education and industry.

“We take great pride in the fact that when our students leave here, they know they’ve made a real contribution to research,” said Zia Isola, director of the office of diversity programs at the Institute of Genomics. UCSC and principal architect of the UCSC summer program. program. “In some cases, this research will continue through the academic year and beyond, and students will continue to contribute data and sometimes even be included as authors in publications.”

This new program follows the successful collaboration of UCSC and CSUMB during a similar National Institutes of Health program called the Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) initiative, which was a five-year program focused on training of students in the field of computational genomics that ran from 2015 to 2020. From this experience, Isola said, the Genomics Institute at UCSC focused more on getting ensure that principal investigators, postdocs and graduate students in the labs are trained in inclusive pedagogy and are prepared to provide the best possible mentorship to visiting students. They also aim to emphasize the cultivation of a sense of belonging and the strengthening of students’ scientific identity.

“Virtually all of the students who attend will be first-generation students from underrepresented populations, who may not have seen role models who look like them, so it’s not always easy to feel that sense of belonging,” Isola said. “We want them to come away with that feeling of ‘I belong here, and if I choose that as a career path, it’s something that’s completely accessible to me. “”

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Fresh Outlook Foundation brings mental health programs for seniors to Vernon – Vernon News https://h-fan.net/fresh-outlook-foundation-brings-mental-health-programs-for-seniors-to-vernon-vernon-news/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 02:00:00 +0000 https://h-fan.net/fresh-outlook-foundation-brings-mental-health-programs-for-seniors-to-vernon-vernon-news/ Photo: Pexels Seniors will benefit from a mental health program that is coming to Vernon. The Fresh Outlook Foundation (FOF) is launching a project to provide mental health education programs designed and produced by seniors in Vernon and beyond. Funded by the Government of Canada’s New Horizons for Seniors Program, the project will enhance HEADS […]]]>

Seniors will benefit from a mental health program that is coming to Vernon.

The Fresh Outlook Foundation (FOF) is launching a project to provide mental health education programs designed and produced by seniors in Vernon and beyond.

Funded by the Government of Canada’s New Horizons for Seniors Program, the project will enhance HEADS UP Community Mental Health’s current programming, including podcasts, videos and e-magazine articles that explore various topics with health professionals health, experts from other sectors and people with lived experience of mental illness and recovery.

“Seniors are living longer and are the fastest growing demographic group in Canada,” says Jo de Vries, Founder and CEO of FOF. “So they need mental health information and inspiration that meets their unique wants and needs. The ideal solution is to have materials planned, researched, written and produced by older people for older people.

The project will launch in September with focus groups in Vernon to identify older adults’ mental health challenges and issues, the types of mental health information older adults seek, the channels they would use to access to this information and the best way to share programming. in networks and institutions for the elderly and the mental health system.

The results will be used to conduct a Canada-wide survey.

All research results will be used to train seniors in topic selection, scripting and producing podcasts, researching and writing articles, and advocacy to help spread the word. to audiences across Canada. Programming will be hosted on FOF’s website and promoted through its networks.

“FOF is grateful for the funding from New Horizons, which supports projects led or inspired by seniors who make a difference in the lives of others in their communities,” says de Vries.

If you are a senior or represent a mental health and/or seniors organization, contact [email protected] participate in a focus group, complete the online survey, create educational materials or promote programming through your networks.

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The R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center celebrates the heroes who come together to provide lifesaving care to critically injured patients https://h-fan.net/the-r-adams-cowley-shock-trauma-center-celebrates-the-heroes-who-come-together-to-provide-lifesaving-care-to-critically-injured-patients/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 21:53:05 +0000 https://h-fan.net/the-r-adams-cowley-shock-trauma-center-celebrates-the-heroes-who-come-together-to-provide-lifesaving-care-to-critically-injured-patients/ Event Highlights Extraordinary Partnership Between Trauma Professionals and First Responders in Maryland BALTIMORE (September 10, 2022) – The R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center at the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC) will host its 32nd annual Shock Trauma Heroes celebration tonight, honoring more than 40 trauma professionals and first responders who worked together to […]]]>

Event Highlights Extraordinary Partnership Between Trauma Professionals and First Responders in Maryland

BALTIMORE (September 10, 2022) – The R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center at the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC) will host its 32nd annual Shock Trauma Heroes celebration tonight, honoring more than 40 trauma professionals and first responders who worked together to save the life of a 51-year-old former highway construction worker whose legs were crushed when he was hit by a car on I-95 and pinned against his truck. He nearly bled to death from his wounds.

The theme for the celebration is “Come Together”, the title of a well-known Beatles song, which also highlights the extraordinary working relationship between Shock Trauma and its Emergency Medical Services (EMS) partners that has makes Maryland a unique and highly coordinated trauma system. a national model. It also acknowledges the philanthropic support that enables Shock Trauma to continue to make significant advances in trauma care and to remain one of the leading trauma centers in the world.

Shock Trauma is Maryland’s highest trauma center – a primary adult resource center, or PARC, where clinicians treat nearly 6,000 critically ill and critically injured patients annually with a 96% survival rate.

“One of my greatest privileges over the past 25 years is to have the opportunity to work alongside our amazing trauma care teams and remarkable partners within Maryland’s EMS system,” said Thomas M. Scalea, MD, the Honorable Francis X. Kelly Distinguished Professor of Trauma Surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) and Chief Medical Officer of Shock Trauma. “Every day, these brave men and women take on unique and complex challenges. They do so without hesitation and sometimes even risking their own health and well-being to save the lives of others.” Dr. Scalea is also the System Chief of Critical Care Services for the University of Maryland Medical System (UMMS) comprised of 11 hospitals.

The event, which will be held from 8 p.m. to midnight at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, will also celebrate Dr. Scalea’s 25 years of service to Shock Trauma. Dr. Scalea first took charge of the world-renowned trauma center and trauma program at UMSOM on January 4, 1997. The Beatles theme pays homage to Dr. Scalea, a longtime fan of the band of British rock.

Proceeds from this year’s celebration will benefit Shock Trauma’s trauma prevention and recovery programs. These programs include Stop the Bleed training and educating adults and teens about risky behaviors such as impaired driving and distracted driving. Next year’s focus is on improving capacity to provide widespread Stop the Bleed training across the state of Maryland. Donations to the program can be made through the UMMS Foundation.

“Despite the challenges the COVID-19 pandemic has put on our ability to run many of our programs, we continued to run 104 events that reached over 6,200 people last year. Education is key to reduce preventable injuries in Maryland and beyond,” said Kristie Snedeker, DPT, vice president of the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center.

Those attending tonight’s celebration will hear the extraordinary story of Amilcar Mendez, of Beltsville, who was seriously injured on February 15, 2020, while working on a construction project on the northbound lanes of the I-95 near Perryville. He was hit by a car and “sandwiched” between the car and his truck, nearly amputating his legs. Within three minutes of the 911 call, Maryland State Police troopers from the JFK Highway Barracks arrived on the scene. Using their Stop the Bleed training, they applied tourniquets to help stop the bleeding in Mendez’s legs and stabilized him before a Maryland State Police medical evacuation helicopter does not transport him to Shock Trauma.

bleed to death

“Mr. Mendez was one of the sickest and most injured people I have ever seen when he arrived at Shock Trauma,” recalled Margaret H. Lauerman, MD, assistant professor of surgery at UMSOM. and attending surgeon at the trauma center. . Dr Scalea added: “He lost a huge amount of blood from his legs. So with the combination of his abdominal bleeding, his pelvic bleeding and his extremity bleeding, he had basically bled to death when he arrived. here.”

Mendez received a massive blood transfusion with over 40 units of red blood cells, plasma and platelets. In addition to his leg injuries, he had fractures to his pelvis, ribs and back, as well as colon injuries and a tear in the ureter leading from a kidney to his bladder. Using mesh, doctors reconstructed his abdominal wall. Surgeons were unable to save Mendez’s legs, which were later amputated above the knee. He underwent 12 surgeries in 25 days.

When Mendez woke up in hospital after the crash, he was emotionally overwhelmed at first, but then thought of his family. “I started to think there was a reason why God gave me a second chance,” he said.

After spending 50 days in Shock Trauma, Mendez was transferred in April 2020 to the University of Maryland Institute of Rehabilitation and Orthopedics, where he received therapy until his discharge two months later, the June 16. A married father of three children, ages 14, 10 and 9, Mendez is able to walk again with the aid of prostheses.

“We went to the gym, we started exercising and they were so nice to me. I can’t explain it, but they changed my mentality,” Mendez said.

Melita M. Theyagaraj, MD, assistant professor of neurology at UMSOM and medical director of the multi-trauma unit at UM’s Institute of Rehabilitation and Orthopedics, said, “Even though he was scared of what was going to happen, what the future would be, how his family would view it, he always had such a positive attitude. And I think that was half the battle.”

“I’m happy to be here,” Mendez said, reflecting on his journey. “There are no words to say ‘Thank you’ for the job they have done. I feel comfortable. I feel good.”

Tyler Adams, a Cecil County paramedic who was at the scene of the crash, said, “Every agency involved really came together to save Mr. Mendez’s life.”

“A remarkable victory”

Dr. Scalea said he doesn’t know how many healthcare providers treated Mendez during his 50-day stay at Shock Trauma, “but if you told me it was a thousand, I wouldn’t be surprised.” . He called Mendez’s recovery a “remarkable victory.”

Forty-three heroes will be honored at tonight’s celebration, including Maryland State Police troopers, Cecil County EMS clinicians and the doctors, nurses and staff who treated Mendez. The celebration will also include “then and now” video updates on four former shock trauma patients and a video highlighting Dr. Scalea’s many accomplishments as a surgeon, physician-researcher, educator and mentor. The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra will perform a selection of Beatles songs. The program ends at 9:30 p.m., followed by an after-party that will continue until midnight.

Dr Scalea said of his milestone birthday: “When I look at what we have been able to accomplish over the past 25 years, I can truly say that we have changed the face of injury care around the world.”

He came to Maryland from New York, where he served as Chief of Critical Care and Trauma and founding Chairman of the Department of Emergency Medicine at Kings County Hospital/SUNY Brooklyn. “I planned to live and die in New York and didn’t really plan on moving to Baltimore,” he recalled. “But when I had the chance, I hesitated for zero seconds and said, ‘Yes’, because it’s Shock Trauma. It’s as good as it gets. When you do what I do, it’s the best job in the country, maybe in the world.”

About the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center

The R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center at the University of Maryland was the first fully integrated trauma center in the world and today remains the epicenter of trauma research, patient care and teaching, both both nationally and internationally. Shock Trauma is where the concept of the “golden hour” of trauma originated and where many lifesaving practices in modern trauma medicine were initiated. Shock Trauma is also at the heart of Maryland’s unparalleled emergency medical service system. Learn more about impact trauma.

About the University of Maryland Medical Center

The University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC) comprises two hospital campuses in Baltimore: the 800-bed flagship institution of the 11-hospital University of Maryland Medical System (UMMS) and the 200-bed UMMC Midtown Campus. Both campuses are academic medical centers for the education of physicians and health professionals and for the pursuit of research and innovation to improve health. UMMC’s downtown campus is a national and regional referral center for trauma, cancer care, neuroscience, advanced cardiovascular care, and women’s and children’s health, and has one of the nation’s largest solid organ transplant programs. All staff physicians on the downtown campus are clinical physicians from the University of Maryland School of Medicine. The medical staff at UMMC Midtown Campus is primarily comprised of faculty physicians specializing in a wide range of medical and surgical subspecialties, adult and pediatric primary care, and behavioral health. UMMC Midtown has been a teaching hospital for 140 years and is located one mile from the downtown campus. For more information, visit www.umm.edu.

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Free health assessments offered by Faith Community Nurse in McDowell County | School of nursing https://h-fan.net/free-health-assessments-offered-by-faith-community-nurse-in-mcdowell-county-school-of-nursing/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 21:06:44 +0000 https://h-fan.net/free-health-assessments-offered-by-faith-community-nurse-in-mcdowell-county-school-of-nursing/ Using the knowledge and skills she gained from the Faith Community Nursing course at the West Virginia University School of Nursing, a local registered nurse is developing a community outreach program that will provide health education, screenings and programs. Support. Every second Tuesday of the month from noon to 5 p.m., Melissa Coleman invites area […]]]>

Using the knowledge and skills she gained from the Faith Community Nursing course at the West Virginia University School of Nursing, a local registered nurse is developing a community outreach program that will provide health education, screenings and programs. Support.

Every second Tuesday of the month from noon to 5 p.m., Melissa Coleman invites area residents to Bradshaw Church of God, located at 10394 Marshall Highway, where they can meet with her to discuss their health concerns.

In addition to conducting health assessments, Coleman said she would like to review the medications individuals are currently taking – “Many patients don’t understand why they are taking the medications they are taking, so I want to help provide that education. “

Coleman, who currently works as a critical care charge nurse and has nearly three decades of experience, participated in a scholarship opportunity from the WVU School of Nursing’s Faith Community Nursing course.

“I love teaching and growing in the church,” Coleman said. “This program taught me what it means to do both – how to integrate spiritual care and health, while being impartial, non-judgmental, and working with cultures and religions other than my own.”

Melissa Coleman, a critical care charge nurse, will provide free health assessments to residents of McDowell County every second Tuesday of the month at Bradshaw Church of God.

Its purpose is to provide community members with education in health issues and management, as well as self-care and health maintenance. She will also provide guidance on integrating faith and healing. As Coleman better understands the health needs of the area, she hopes to offer group educational sessions on topics such as diabetes, atrial fibrillation (A-fib), congestive heart failure, kidney failure and more. .

Supplies needed for the community outreach program are provided through a donation from the Rusty and Kimberly Hutson Family Foundation, and the pastor of Bradshaw Church of God has been a strong supporter of the initiative. When Coleman approached Pastor Brian Patterson and his wife Jenna, who is also a nurse, they were more than willing to provide the space she needed.

“We’re so excited for this opportunity because Melissa Coleman is not only a great nurse, but she’s also a wonderful person inside and out,” said Pastor Patterson. “I know this program will be a huge blessing to our community.

For people in rural areas, a little help can go a long way, as Coleman said many specialists are located an hour or more away. She hopes to set up telehealth visits for patients who cannot travel when more specialized care is needed.

Coleman hopes the faith community environment will provide a welcoming, non-judgmental space for community members to work towards improving their health. She said people from all walks of life, regardless of their religious beliefs, are welcome.

“I hope that people who may be afraid to go to a clinic for treatment will feel more comfortable in this space, to come and talk about their health and to open up, rather than being in a crowded waiting room.

To learn more about Faith Community Nursing, visit nursing.wvu.edu or contact Angel Smothers at asmothers@hsc.wvu.edu. To learn more about the McDowell County Health Program, contact Melissa Coleman at melissacolemanfcn@gmail.com

-WVU-

CONTACT: Wendy Holden
Communications and Marketing Director
WVU School of Nursing
304-581-1772; wendy.holdren@hsc.wvu.edu

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Department of Health announces new health commissioner https://h-fan.net/department-of-health-announces-new-health-commissioner/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 13:41:28 +0000 https://h-fan.net/department-of-health-announces-new-health-commissioner/ On Monday, Sept. 6, the City of St. Louis Health Department announced that Victoria Anwuri will join the Health Department staff as Health Commissioner. “I am delighted to announce the appointment of Victoria Anwuri as the City of St. Louis Health Commissioner. She brings more than 20 years of equity-focused public and community health experience […]]]>

On Monday, Sept. 6, the City of St. Louis Health Department announced that Victoria Anwuri will join the Health Department staff as Health Commissioner.

“I am delighted to announce the appointment of Victoria Anwuri as the City of St. Louis Health Commissioner. She brings more than 20 years of equity-focused public and community health experience to the Department of Health,” said Dr. Mati Hlatshwayo Davis, Chief Health Officer for the City of St. Louis. “I am delighted to be able to tap into his extensive expertise and experience in strategic planning, programming, multidisciplinary evaluations, and management of federal and state grants and contracts.”

Ms. Anwuri joins the Department of Health from her current position as associate director of the Institute of Public Health at Washington University in St. Louis. At the Institute, she oversees all research, programmatic, administrative and operational activities. Prior to accepting this position, Ms. Anwuri held several other positions at the University of Washington and also worked at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, Georgia, as a public health fellow where she conducted policy, environmental and systems research. interventions that promote health.

With her experience in overseeing all programmatic, administrative and operational activities of the Institute of Public Health, Ms. Anwuri will be able to immediately provide much needed support to Dr. Mati Hlatshwayo Davis in the organizational and administrative operations of the Ministry of Health. Health, which is a current priority for her for the department and to fill this position.

Ms. Anwuri is also adept at building partnerships with national and local stakeholders from different disciplines to achieve positive results. Partnerships and collaborations are at the heart of the soul of public health operations and efforts in the City of St. Louis.

Born in the Los Angeles area of ​​Southern California, Ms. Anwuri is a long-time resident of St. Louis. She holds a Masters in Public Health from the Saint Louis University College for Public Health and Social Justice (formerly Saint Louis University School of Public Health) where she was inducted into Delta Omega, the Honorary Public Health Society. She also holds a bachelor’s degree from Anwuri College where she studied psychology.

The position of commissioner has general oversight of public health and is responsible for the administration of public health programs. The Commissioner is also responsible for ensuring compliance with and enforcement of laws and ordinances relating to public health.

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Why McLaren doctors learned from an expert | McLaren Healthcare News https://h-fan.net/why-mclaren-doctors-learned-from-an-expert-mclaren-healthcare-news/ Sun, 04 Sep 2022 14:52:30 +0000 https://h-fan.net/why-mclaren-doctors-learned-from-an-expert-mclaren-healthcare-news/ September 04, 2022 Author: McLaren Flint Dr. Jim Withers, an internationally renowned medical expert in treating the homeless and founder of the Street Medicine Institute, led doctors at McLaren Flint in a “street class” to help homeless patients receive medical care on August 4. His visit included a lecture, a small group discussion […]]]>


Author: McLaren Flint

Dr. Jim Withers, an internationally renowned medical expert in treating the homeless and founder of the Street Medicine Institute, led doctors at McLaren Flint in a “street class” to help homeless patients receive medical care on August 4. His visit included a lecture, a small group discussion at the Carriage Town Ministries healthcare clinic, and an effort to find and reach those living on the city streets.

Dr. Withers has been teaching street medicine and treating the homeless for almost 30 years. His teaching began in Pittsburgh, and in 2009 he and other leaders in this field of medicine established the Street Medicine Institute (SMI), a nonprofit organization that facilitates and improves the direct delivery of health care to homeless homeless where they live. SMI achieves this by providing communities and clinicians with expert training, guidance and support to develop and grow their own street medicine programs.

“Words are not enough to describe what Dr. Jim Withers has done over the past three decades to help those who need our help the most and who are often excluded from medical care for many different reasons,” said Dr. Prabhat K. Pokhrel, Director of the Family Medicine Residency Program at McLaren Flint. “We have partnered with Carriage Town Ministries to help care for homeless patients and would like to extend our services to those living on the streets.

“No one, in my opinion, can teach us these unique skills better than Dr. Jim Withers.”

The McLaren Flint Family Medicine Residency Program, with help from the McLaren Flint Foundation and the Graduate Medical Office, has started its own street medicine program to teach family medicine residents how to care for people who are homeless. The connection to Dr. Withers was made by McLaren Flint Family Medicine resident Meghana Swamy, MD.

“About a year ago, Dr. Pokhrel approached me to help him develop a plan to start a street medicine program for our family medicine residency program,” said Dr. Swamy. “I read an article about Dr Withers, watched several of his videos and decided to contact him directly. His humanitarian work is phenomenal. We are so grateful that he spent a day with us here in Flint.

SMI has become the world leader in developing the field and practice of street medicine and has helped cultivate or improve programs in more than 140 cities in 27 countries on six continents.

SMI is also a community of members that allows professionals and others interested in the street medicine movement to come together to provide peer support, share best practices, seek advice and learn about key concepts necessary for the success of a program.

“I am delighted to see the combination of service and medical training in the program at McLaren Flint,” said Dr Withers. “Leaders and residents are truly committed to expanding these services to help Flint’s homeless population. Speaking directly to this unique group of individuals not only helps them get health care, but can also get them housing and the other things they deserve.

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West End Health Foundation awards $30,000 to youth mental health programs in the Ishpeming area https://h-fan.net/west-end-health-foundation-awards-30000-to-youth-mental-health-programs-in-the-ishpeming-area/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 23:30:00 +0000 https://h-fan.net/west-end-health-foundation-awards-30000-to-youth-mental-health-programs-in-the-ishpeming-area/ ISHPEMING, Mich. (WLUC) – The West End Health Foundation recently awarded $30,000 for its 2022 Proactive Grants cycle. The Proactive Grants program was limited to programs and services developed to address the well-being of young people by putting the focus on mental health. Three applications were funded based on a competitive review of organization, program […]]]>

ISHPEMING, Mich. (WLUC) – The West End Health Foundation recently awarded $30,000 for its 2022 Proactive Grants cycle. The Proactive Grants program was limited to programs and services developed to address the well-being of young people by putting the focus on mental health. Three applications were funded based on a competitive review of organization, program and quality of proposal.

The following grants have been awarded:

The Ishpeming Public School District will receive $15,250 to deliver a mental health and suicide awareness program featuring Kevin Hines.

Hines is a suicide survivor who has dedicated his life to educating the public about mental health and suicide prevention. Ever since he attempted suicide by jumping off the Golden Gate Bridge in September 2000, he’s been busy sharing his story through in-person presentations and through a documentary called Suicide: The Ripple Effect. He also wrote a memoir titled “Cracked Not Broken, Surviving and Thriving After a Suicide Attempt”. Grant funds will be used to host Hines during programs for students in the Ishpeming, Negaunee, Westwood and Republic Michigamme school districts.

The Ishpeming School District poses with a check.(WLUC)

Great Lakes Recovery Centers received $9,190 to improve access to mental health services by increasing provider hours at their specialized child and adolescent psychiatry clinic in Negaunee.

This grant will provide 115 additional youth and their families with behavioral health services. The range of services that could be provided to these clients will include trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy, individual and play therapy, psychiatric assessments, medication management and family therapy depending on the needs of each individual.

Great Lakes Recovery Centers poses with a check for $9,190.
Great Lakes Recovery Centers poses with a check for $9,190.(WLUC)

The Ishpeming Cancer Society, also known as Cancer Care of Marquette County, will receive $5,560 to help meet the mental health needs of young cancer patients.

Established in 1979, the Ishpeming Cancer Society helps Marquette County residents who have been diagnosed with cancer. The organization provides financial assistance for treatment, medication, travel, equipment and supplies for cancer patients. The organization also serves as a support network for cancer patients and their families.

Cancer Care of Marquette County poses with a check for $5,560.
Cancer Care of Marquette County poses with a check for $5,560.(WLUC)

“We understand the importance of improving mental health services for young people in our community,” said Amy Clickner, Chair of the West End Foundation’s Philanthropy Committee. “We received ten proposals requesting over $80,000 and after careful consideration, our Board of Directors has determined that the programs offered by these three organizations will have the most positive impact on local youth. The West End is fortunate to have dedicated professionals in place to help young people cope with the difficulties they face today.

In addition to the Proactive Grant Awards, the West End Health Foundation also presented a check for $15,200 to the Upper Peninsula Diabetes Outreach Network for the 2022 Teal Lake Swim.

The foundation has proudly provided matching fund support to the Swim Teal Lake Diabetes Benefit since 2014. Swim Teal Lake is a fundraiser for the Upper Peninsula Diabetes Awareness Network, which has been recognized at the National Scale for Improving Diabetes Care and Outcomes in the Upper Peninsula. . UPDON ensures that cost-effective diabetes prevention, detection, treatment, supplies and support services are available, educates about diabetes to prevent complications, maintains a broad UP coalition to improve collaboration, and identify and fill gaps in diabetes services, and works with health care professionals to build knowledge about diabetes treatment and care delivery.

Teal Lake Swim poses with a check for $15,200.
Teal Lake Swim poses with a check for $15,200.(WLUC)

The next round of West End Health Foundation grants will take place this fall and will focus on programs and services that improve health and well-being. Additional information can be found at westendhf.org or by contacting Mary Myers, Director of Business Development, Lake Superior Community Partnership at mary@marquette.org or 906-226-6591 ext. 104.

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