Health Programs – H Fan http://h-fan.net/ Tue, 17 May 2022 07:01:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://h-fan.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2-150x150.png Health Programs – H Fan http://h-fan.net/ 32 32 Dial Help offers many mental health programs and services | News, Sports, Jobs https://h-fan.net/dial-help-offers-many-mental-health-programs-and-services-news-sports-jobs/ Tue, 17 May 2022 07:01:48 +0000 https://h-fan.net/dial-help-offers-many-mental-health-programs-and-services-news-sports-jobs/ Virginia Lambert, left, and Paige Setter-Hallwachs, of Dial Help Victim Services, discussed the mental health services and programs offered by Dial Help during the May 11 mental health presentation in Houghton. (Graham Jaehnig/Daily Mining Gazette) HOUGHTON – Dial Help is a non-profit crisis center serving the Upper Peninsula, located in Houghton, […]]]>

Virginia Lambert, left, and Paige Setter-Hallwachs, of Dial Help Victim Services, discussed the mental health services and programs offered by Dial Help during the May 11 mental health presentation in Houghton. (Graham Jaehnig/Daily Mining Gazette)

HOUGHTON – Dial Help is a non-profit crisis center serving the Upper Peninsula, located in Houghton, that offers a wide range of services to residents in need. Some of the programs it offers include youth services, victim services, peer coaching for substance use disorder recovery, school-based prevention, home family support, and education and training programs. It also offers crisis counseling and training in suicide prevention techniques.

Dial Help was established in 1971 by a group of citizens concerned about drug addiction. From that original group of volunteers who manned the crisis line, it has grown into a non-profit organization of over 50 staff and volunteers offering a variety of services. Dial Help’s mission is to promote the physical, emotional and social well-being of its communities. It achieves this goal by providing problem assistance, crisis intervention, referrals, education and training.

Virginia Lambert, MS, of Dial Help Victim Services, said the crisis line is what people most associate with Dial Help. The line, she said, extended to the entire Upper Peninsula in 1976. Lambert spoke at a public program on mental health services and challenges in the community, which was held May 11 at the Portage Lake District Library. Representatives from three agencies and one organization provided information on resources available to those seeking help or information about mental illness and treatment.

“We have round-the-clock access to trained crisis specialists,” Lambert during a public presentation at the Houghton Library last week. In addition to calling, she added, people can now text and instant message through the website (https://dialhelp.org/).

“We are able to reach a wider group of people because as you know a lot of our kids don’t want to pick up the phone and call us, they would rather text you,” she says. “So we’re trying to keep up and connect with people who want to ask for help.”

Lambert said Dial Help also runs a safety net program that offers follow-up support via phone call or text message to people facing suicide risk or complex loss, addiction or crisis.

Monitoring includes:

– Emotional support

– Ongoing assessment of mood and potential risk of suicide or relapse

– Assistance with security planning

– Connection to resources to overcome obstacles.

“The program offers aftercare support for people who are having issues – maybe suicidal ideation, complex trauma – maybe you’ve lost someone to suicide and just want someone to follow you. “

Sometimes it’s hard to make appointments with counsellors, she says, adding, “In the meantime, you can have someone from our agency contact you, kind of check in, plan a safety plan with you, find you any resources you may need, while you wait for your next appointment. of advice.”

The Safety Net program is available throughout UP, according to Lambert.

Additionally, there is the National Suicide Crisis Line to which Dial Help responds.

“We hear things from all over the country,” said Lambert, “and it’s really amazing and exciting to see people reaching out when they need help – like, the stigma can stop now.”

Dial Help runs its Youth One-Stop program, which is group mental health counseling therapy, family support and other clinical support for youth in crisis, Lambert said.

The website indicates that the program offers specialized services for risks related to mental health, addictions or other problems; includes crisis intervention, referral, follow-up, family support and counselling.

Lambert said Dial Help has people at many area schools who are there for specific purposes. They can receive support for children in crisis or who may be on the verge of crisis.

Lambert said the program is operating in at least five area schools and continues to grow.

“The more people who hear about this program, the more benefits they get from it,”she says, “The more schools that sign up and let us in, and allow us to help young people.”

Dial Help also performs suicide assessments in emergency rooms through UP Health Systems.

Another important community program offered by Dial Help is its support for victims of crime. These include sexual assault, child abuse, as well as other crimes including elder abuse and domestic violence.

The crime victim support program will be reviewed in Wednesday’s edition of the Daily Mining Gazette.

For more information about Dial Help and its services, visit its website at https://dialhelp.org/ or

Business Line: 906-482-9077

Fax: 906-482-2502

General email: dial.help@dialhelp.org (This email is not permanently monitored, use the crisis contacts above for crisis services)

Crisis contacts:

– Crisis call: 800-562-7622 or 906-482-HELP

– Crisis Text: 35NEEDS (906-356-3337)

EDITOR’S NOTE: This is the second in a series that will explore services available for mental health-related issues, including assessments, insurance and programs available in the four county area.



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UCLA Technology Program Becomes Official Course and Focuses on Problem-Solving Skills https://h-fan.net/ucla-technology-program-becomes-official-course-and-focuses-on-problem-solving-skills/ Sat, 14 May 2022 22:01:00 +0000 https://h-fan.net/ucla-technology-program-becomes-official-course-and-focuses-on-problem-solving-skills/ A tech entrepreneurship boot camp recently became an official course at UCLA after four years of operating as an informal program. The course, Engineering 170: “Project-Based Technology Bootcamp for Social Impact,” was originally inspired by students in 2017, said Raffi Simonian, senior program manager at the Office of Advanced Research Computing and instructor. of Engineering […]]]>

A tech entrepreneurship boot camp recently became an official course at UCLA after four years of operating as an informal program.

The course, Engineering 170: “Project-Based Technology Bootcamp for Social Impact,” was originally inspired by students in 2017, said Raffi Simonian, senior program manager at the Office of Advanced Research Computing and instructor. of Engineering 170. A major goal of the course is to equip students with the skills they would need as future entrepreneurs in the tech industry, he said.

Simonian said boot camp differs from other courses at the university because it exposes students to tasks and issues that arise in the tech workplace.

“I don’t see it as an academic program, it’s more of a skill building,” Simonian said. “Eventually, education will be based on skills rather than degrees.”

Students in the class develop pitches focused on finding a solution to a social problem with a technology idea or product, ranging from civic issues to health issues, Simonian said. At the start of term, students are divided into teams based on the social orientation of their presentation, he added. He said each team has its own industry coach who works in technology and helps guide students through their projects.

During the first six weeks of term, students listen to guest speakers present on a topic related to the tech industry and startups, sharing knowledge on topics such as design and project management, Simonian said. At the end of term, students present their ideas and are evaluated on how well they incorporate ideas from guest lecturers’ lessons, Simonian added.

At the demo day, held at the end of term, Simonian said five technology professionals came to listen to student presentations and assess how effectively they applied their learning to their work. project. It aims to accommodate a mix of private and public sector judges and also tries to involve UCLA alumni in the process.

[Related: LA-area high school students compete in UCLA’s 1st ideathon for health technology]

Third-year human biology and society student Emily Noronha said the boot camp was more like internships and other extracurricular programs she had taken than her other classes.

She said she appreciates that the class format gives students the opportunity to truly network with individuals in the tech industry, which isn’t always possible with the competition of a formal recruiting environment.

The training camp has doubled in size since its inception in 2018, Simonian said.

At the start of the program, 44 students applied and 24 were accepted and split into three teams, Simonian said. Applications have increased to 250 students in recent cycles, and there are now six teams with 48 students in total, he added.

Looking ahead, Simonian said he hopes to secure private grants to fund the program, continue to grow it, and eventually partner with different companies — such as Sony, Disney and Amazon — to use Engineering 170 as a recruiting tool. .

The current coaches are volunteers, Simonian said, adding that most of them became interested in coaching the students after attending previous demo day presentations.

“I was really impressed with the ingenuity and intelligence of the groups,” said Behrang Abadi, one of the industry coaches and head of the City of Long Beach’s technology office.

Abadi said he sees his role as a coach as a bridge between the academic intelligence and the practical skills of the students.

Andrew Johnson, director of source-to-pay systems at Sony, said the students in the class had unique approaches to modern issues.

“Students work differently than most of the professionals I work with in my day-to-day work,” Johnson said. “It’s a talent that you don’t really see when you go to LinkedIn.”

Sumita Jonak, CEO and founder of Nurlabs – an early cancer diagnosis company – is the health technology group coach. Jonak, an alumnus of the UCLA Anderson School of Management, echoed Johnson’s appreciation for student creativity.

“It gives me so much hope for the next generation of scientific achievement,” Jonak said.

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Census undercount threatens federal food and health programs on reservations https://h-fan.net/census-undercount-threatens-federal-food-and-health-programs-on-reservations/ Thu, 12 May 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://h-fan.net/census-undercount-threatens-federal-food-and-health-programs-on-reservations/ The 2020 census missed nearly 1 in 17 Native Americans living on reservations, an undercount that could very well lead to insufficient federal funding for essential health, nutrition and social programs in remote communities with rates of poverty and limited access to services. The census counted 9.7 million people who identified as Native American or […]]]>

The 2020 census missed nearly 1 in 17 Native Americans living on reservations, an undercount that could very well lead to insufficient federal funding for essential health, nutrition and social programs in remote communities with rates of poverty and limited access to services.

The census counted 9.7 million people who identified as Native American or Alaska Native in 2020 — alone or in combination with another race or ethnicity — up from 5.2 million in 2010. But the native population of some 325 reservations nationwide was underestimated by nearly 6%, according to a demographic analysis of census accuracy. Indigenous peoples on reservations are used to being underestimated – almost 5% were missed in 2010, according to the analysis.

At least 1 in 5 Native Americans live on reservations, according to previous census data. More detailed Native American population data from the 2020 census will be released over the next year.

Census figures help determine how much money is allocated to various programs on reservations such as health care, social services, education and infrastructure. For example, on the Blackfeet Reservation in northwestern Montana, the co-chair of a food pantry whose funding depends in part on census counts fears that undercounts will make it harder after this year to all families who need free meals to access them.

The pantry — run by an organization called FAST Blackfeet, which stands for Food Access and Sustainability Team — serves about 400 households a week, Danielle Antelope said. The 2020 census puts the population of the Blackfoot Reservation at 9,900, which Antelope says “does not reflect our numbers in reality.”

Thirty-seven percent of Blackfeet reservation residents lived below the poverty line from 2014 to 2018, compared to a statewide average of 13 percent, according to periodic estimates from the American Community Survey.

“I see the issue of census undercount as having to do with representing need,” Antelope said.

Antelope said he has seen firsthand what it means when people living on reservations fall through the cracks. His mother was a bus driver who earned too much money to qualify for income-tested federal food assistance programs, but not enough to adequately feed her children. The family depended on processed foods from the frozen aisle.

When produce is expensive or hard to find, inexpensive packaged meals are often the only option. “As we now know, these cheap foods are linked to health disparities,” Antelope said. “And those health disparities are high in communities of color and tribal communities.”

Census errors are not limited to Native Americans on reservations. Blacks (3%) and Hispanics (5%) living in the United States were also underestimated. Meanwhile, whites were overcounted (2%).

Among U.S. states, Montana has the fourth-largest share of Native residents, at 6%, and Native Americans are the second largest racial or ethnic group in the state, after people who identify as white. The percentage rises to 9% when it includes people who identify as “American Indian and Alaska Natives alone or in combination” with another race or ethnicity. Most Native residents live on one of Montana’s seven reservations or in a nearby city or county.

The Indian Health Service, the federal agency required to provide medical care to most native residents of the country, receives funding partly based on the census. Nationally in 2019, the most recent year for which data is available, IHS spent $4,078 per person, according to agency data. In comparison, Medicaid, the federal health insurance program for people with low income and certain disabilities, spent more than double that rate, $8,436. A note from the United States Government Accountability Office noted that the usefulness of per capita comparisons is limited because federal programs vary widely.

Health gaps were visible during the pandemic. In Montana, the leading cause of death among Indigenous people in 2020 was covid, largely due to other conditions people had, such as respiratory disease, obesity, and diabetes. Heart disease was the second leading cause of death.

More accurate censuses would lead to “increased financial support from the federal government and even the state government,” said Leonard Smith, CEO of the Billings-based Native American Development Corp., a nonprofit organization company that provides technical assistance and financial services to small businesses. . “I think it makes people realize that there is a much larger indigenous population than is reported, and so it becomes a higher priority. It’s all about the numbers, Smith said.

A more accurate count could also help improve on-reserve infrastructure and housing.

Federal housing assistance remains inaccessible to many households on tribal reservations. Research indicates a strong relationship between housing and better health outcomes. A 2020 study published in the journal BMC Public Health concluded that nearly 70% of people who obtained safe and stable housing reported “significantly better” health outcomes nine to 12 months later, compared to then. where they experienced housing insecurity.

According to a 2017 report by the National Congress of American Indians, more than 15% of homes in areas on or near Indigenous reservations were considered overcrowded – meaning there was more than one person per room, including living rooms, kitchens, bedrooms, and enclosed porches — compared to 2% of homes among other populations.

Although about a quarter of households have incomes below 50% of the federal poverty level, according to the report, only about 12% received federal housing assistance. Census data is used to determine housing and community development grant funding.

“When a census undercounts an Indigenous community, it has a direct, long-term impact on the resources the community receives – things like schools and parks, health care facilities and roads,” said said Michael Campbell, deputy director of Native American. Rights Fund in Boulder, Colorado.

The impact of undercount on funding transcends budgets and social programs. This creates a feeling among indigenous peoples that their presence in this country matters less than that of others, leading to both political disenfranchisement and personal harm, tribal members said.

“Because for so many years we got used to not being counted, we don’t have this aspiration for our government to create space for us now,” Antelope said. “When we have accurate numbers that reflect our community, our voice is heard and we can get services and funding that better reflects our community. »

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The city of St. Petersburg prioritizes mental health throughout the year https://h-fan.net/the-city-of-st-petersburg-prioritizes-mental-health-throughout-the-year/ Tue, 10 May 2022 18:02:43 +0000 https://h-fan.net/the-city-of-st-petersburg-prioritizes-mental-health-throughout-the-year/ City of St. Petersburg prioritizes mental health year-round – for St. Pete residents and city staff As the topic of mental health continues to be a priority and discussed nationally, the City of St. Petersburg has created accessible resources and programs for its residents and team members to ensure that they feel supported and seen. […]]]>

City of St. Petersburg prioritizes mental health year-round – for St. Pete residents and city staff

As the topic of mental health continues to be a priority and discussed nationally, the City of St. Petersburg has created accessible resources and programs for its residents and team members to ensure that they feel supported and seen. In recognition of Mental Health Awareness Month, we have compiled resources available to residents and the municipal team.

For residents:

Keep health in mind
It is a known fact that physical exercise has a positive impact on your mental health. Exercise can reduce stress, increase steam, improve sleep, and boost brain health.

The City of St. Petersburg’s Healthy St. Pete Program focuses on creating a culture of health in St. Pete by making the healthy choice the easy choice. To learn more about how you can participate in programs – ranging from free fitness classes to food programs to educational opportunities and more – visit: https://www.healthystpetefl.com/.

The CALL program
Instead of sending police to non-violent and/or non-emergency mental health-related calls, the City is deploying social workers — with specific expertise — to the situation to help and support. Since the program’s inception on February 2, 2021, CALL has served over 2,500 customers. The program started as a pilot program, and has now started a two-year contact due to its good results.

Here are the statistics:

  • CALL has made over 2,100 contacts in the community
  • No incidents of injury or violence have occurred
  • Less than 4% of CALL’s field responses required law enforcement assistance.
  • CALL’s 24/7 number was provided over 1,000 times for citizens to use as a resource instead of calling the police for non-emergency needs

Funding for our partners
The Veterans, Homelessness and Social Services Division works with community partners to provide funding to a multitude of non-profit organizations that serve individuals and families who are homeless or at the verge of homelessness. become. Some of the clients they serve have a mental health diagnosis.

Below is a list of resources to share or refer to for help:

  • Directions for Living – https://directionsforliving.org/
  • Boley Centers, Inc. – https://boleycenters.org/
  • Saint Vincent de Paul – https://www.svdpsp.org/
  • Catholic Charities – https://www.ccdosp.org/

General support
211 Tampa Bay is a great community resource to share with family members or friends who are struggling to find the best fit for what they are looking for: https://211tampabay.org/mental-health/

For our municipal team

For all municipal staff:

The City of St. Petersburg has a non-emergency line that employees can call if they are in distress or are experiencing a mental health episode or moment of distress. This number is monitored 24/7 by city staff who are trained to work with mental health cases and situations.

For the Public Safety Team:

St. Pete Fire and Rescue Services and St. Pete Police Department offer a number of programs to help their team and families with mental health issues and personal stress.

  • They have a contract with a licensed clinical psychologist who specializes in behavioral health and first responder wellness. Officers and employees can schedule sessions with her at her office. It also offers training and thematic videos.
  • Their Critical Incident Stress Management team is a comprehensive, integrated, systematic and multi-faceted crisis response approach to managing critical incident stress after traumatic events. CISM is a coordinated program of tactics used to minimize reactions to traumatic experiences through the use of defusing, debriefings and/or demobilizations.
  • The PEER support team provides individual crisis management by peers. Peer support is an intervention designed to alleviate symptoms of stress, whether attributed to a single event or ongoing experiences. Peer support team members can reach out to employees following a traumatic/critical incident or serve as an available resource when voluntarily contacted by an employee in need.
  • The chaplaincy program provides emotional and spiritual support to employees and their respective families, and assists the agency with victims and families of victims as needed.

Mental health is a critical part of moving this St. Pete forward – both for our city staff and for our residents. If you know someone who needs to read this or need help today, please share or connect them to the resources they need. We are all in the same boat. We are St. Pete.

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Good IPC programs can reduce infections by 70% — WHO https://h-fan.net/good-ipc-programs-can-reduce-infections-by-70-who/ Mon, 09 May 2022 01:33:28 +0000 https://h-fan.net/good-ipc-programs-can-reduce-infections-by-70-who/ The pandemic and other major recent outbreaks have highlighted the extent to which healthcare facilities can contribute to the spread of infections, harming patients, healthcare workers and visitors, if insufficient attention is paid to prevention and infection control (IPC). However, a new report from the World Health Organization (WHO) shows that when good hand hygiene […]]]>
Good IPC programs can reduce infections by 70% — WHO

The pandemic and other major recent outbreaks have highlighted the extent to which healthcare facilities can contribute to the spread of infections, harming patients, healthcare workers and visitors, if insufficient attention is paid to prevention and infection control (IPC).

However, a new report from the World Health Organization (WHO) shows that when good hand hygiene and other cost-effective practices are followed, 70% of these infections can be prevented.

Nosocomial infections

Today, out of 100 patients in acute care hospitals, seven patients in high-income countries and 15 patients in low- and middle-income countries will acquire at least one hospital-acquired infection (HAI) during their hospital stay. hospital. On average, 1 in 10 patients will die from this infection.

People in intensive care and newborns are particularly at risk. And the report finds that about one in four sepsis cases treated in hospital and almost half of all sepsis cases with organ dysfunction treated in adult intensive care units are healthcare-associated.

Today, on the eve of World Hand Hygiene Day, WHO is previewing the first ever Global Report on Infection Prevention and Control which brings together evidence from the scientific literature and various reports, as well as new data from WHO studies.

Take stock

“The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed many IPC challenges and gaps in all regions and countries, including those with the most advanced IPC programs, said Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director general of the WHO. “It also provided an unprecedented opportunity to take stock of the situation and rapidly scale up epidemic preparedness and response through IPC practices, as well as strengthen IPC programs across the health system. . Our challenge now is to ensure that all countries are able to allocate the necessary human resources, supplies and infrastructure. »

The new WHO report provides the first-ever global situational analysis of how IPC programs are being implemented in countries around the world, including regional and national priorities. While highlighting the harm to patients and healthcare workers from hospital-acquired infections and antimicrobial resistance, the report also discusses the impact and cost-effectiveness of infection prevention and control programs as well as strategies and resources available to countries to improve them.

HAI and antimicrobial resistance

The impact of nosocomial infections and antimicrobial resistance on people’s lives is incalculable. More than 24% of patients with nosocomial sepsis and 52.3% of patients treated in intensive care units die each year. Deaths are multiplied by two or three when infections are resistant to antimicrobials.

Over the past five years, WHO has conducted global surveys and joint country assessments to assess the status of implementation of national IPC programmes. Comparing data from the 2017-2018 and 2021-22 surveys, the percentage of countries with a national IPC program has not improved; furthermore, in 2021-2022, only four of the 106 countries assessed (3.8%) had all minimum IPC requirements in place at the national level. This is reflected in the inadequate implementation of IPC practices at the point of care, with only 15.2% of health facilities meeting all minimum IPC requirements, according to a WHO survey in 2019.

IPC Focal Points

However, encouraging progress has been made in some areas, with a significant increase in the percentage of countries having a designated IPC focal point, a dedicated IPC budget and a training program for frontline health workers; develop national IPC guidelines and a national HAI surveillance program or plan; use multimodal strategies for IPC interventions; and make hand hygiene compliance a key national indicator.

Many countries are showing strong commitment and progress in scaling up actions to put in place minimum requirements and core components of IPC programs. Progress is strongly supported by WHO and other key players. Sustaining and expanding this long-term progress is a critical need that requires urgent attention and investment.

The report finds that high-income countries are more likely to advance their work on the IPC and are eight times more likely to have more advanced IPC implementation status than low-income countries. Indeed, little improvement has been observed between 2018 and 2021 in the implementation of national IPC programs in low-income countries, despite increased attention generally given to IPC due to the COVID-19 pandemic. WHO will continue to support countries to ensure that IPC programs can be improved in each region.

WHO calls on all countries in the world to increase investment in IPC programs to ensure quality of care and safety for patients and health workers. This will not only protect their populations, but increased investment in IPC has also been shown to improve health outcomes and reduce health care costs and out-of-pocket expenses.

Image credit: ©stock.adobe.com/au/Raul Mellado

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Van Hollen, Bennet, Stabenow, Coons Request to include funding for farm bill conservation programs in the fiscal year 2023 budget https://h-fan.net/van-hollen-bennet-stabenow-coons-request-to-include-funding-for-farm-bill-conservation-programs-in-the-fiscal-year-2023-budget/ Fri, 06 May 2022 23:55:42 +0000 https://h-fan.net/van-hollen-bennet-stabenow-coons-request-to-include-funding-for-farm-bill-conservation-programs-in-the-fiscal-year-2023-budget/ May 06, 2022 Senators are also asking for $1 billion to continue to scale up conservation operations and help ensure farmers, ranchers and foresters can be part of the climate solution. Today, U.S. Senator Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.) joined Senators Michael Bennet (D-Colo.), Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.), and Chris Coons (D-Del.) in asking full funding for […]]]>

May 06, 2022

Senators are also asking for $1 billion to continue to scale up conservation operations and help ensure farmers, ranchers and foresters can be part of the climate solution.

Today, U.S. Senator Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.) joined Senators Michael Bennet (D-Colo.), Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.), and Chris Coons (D-Del.) in asking full funding for conservation of the Farm Bill. Fiscal Year 2023 Budget Programs. In their letter to the Subcommittee on Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies of the U.S. Senate Appropriations Committee, the senators also request dollars to continue to augment the United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS). ) Conservation operations to help ensure that farmers, ranchers and foresters can be part of the climate solution.

“Recognizing the importance of land-based solutions in the fight against climate change, there is a need for continued federal investments in United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) conservation programs, wrote the senators. “We need significant investments in USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) personnel and resources to help farmers, ranchers, and foresters mitigate and adapt to climate change.”

In the recent FY22 omnibus spending bill, the Senate passed $904 million for NRCS conservation operations.

NRCS staff help implement several Farm Bill conservation programs that are essential in helping farmers, foresters and ranchers conserve land and water, protect water quality and improve water quality. soil health.

The senators continued: “As producers face increasing productivity and environmental challenges such as droughts, wildfires and floods, these programs help build resilience and support the economic viability of family farms. These programs also help growers implement climate-smart conservation practices and improve productivity. Maintaining full mandatory funding, as authorized in the 2018 Farm Bill, will maintain the productivity of working farms and ranches and benefit the environment.

In addition to Van Hollen, Bennet, Stabenow, and Coons, this letter is signed by U.S. Senators Tim Kaine (D-Va.), Chris Murphy (D-Conn.), Bob Casey (D-Pa.), Ben Cardin ( D-Md.), Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.), Angus King (I-Maine), Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), Tom Carper (D-Del.), Cory Booker (DN.J.), Tammy Duckworth (D-Ill.), John Hickenlooper (D-Colo.), Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio), Raphael Warnock (D-Ga.), Sheldon Whitehouse (DR.I .), Richard Durbin (D-Ill.), Jeanne Shaheen (DN.H.), Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) and Tina Smith (D-Minn.).

The text of the letter is available HERE and below.

Dear President Baldwin and Member of the Hoeven Ranking:

Thank you for your work to fully fund Farm Bill conservation programs and increase conservation operations in the fiscal year 2022 omnibus appropriation bill. As your subcommittee considers its appropriation bill for In fiscal year 2023, we are writing to ask you to support full mandatory funding for the Farm Bill’s conservation programs and continue to increase conservation operations by providing $1 billion to it.

Earlier this month, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released its Sixth Assessment Report, which provides an updated global assessment of climate change mitigation progress and commitments. , and examines the sources of global emissions. The IPCC report makes it clear that land-based mitigation actions in the agriculture, forestry and other land use sectors represent some of the most important options currently available for emission reductions at large-scale and large-scale carbon dioxide removal and storage.

Recognizing the importance of land-based solutions in the fight against climate change, there is a need for continued federal investments in United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) conservation programs. We need significant investments in USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) personnel and resources to help farmers, ranchers, and foresters mitigate and adapt to climate change.

NRCS staff help implement a number of Farm Law Conservation programs such as the Environmental Quality Incentive Program (EQIP), Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP), Agricultural Conservation Easements Program (ACEP) and the Regional Conservation Partnership Program (RCPP). These programs are essential to help farmers, foresters and ranchers conserve land and water, protect water quality and improve soil health. As producers face increasing productivity and environmental challenges such as droughts, wildfires and floods, these programs help build resilience and support the economic viability of family farms. These programs also help growers implement climate-smart conservation practices and improve productivity. Maintaining full mandatory funding, as authorized in the 2018 Farm Bill, will maintain the productivity of working farms and ranches and benefit the environment.

NRCS field staff are an invaluable resource to farmers and ranchers across the country, providing direct technical assistance and planning support for those wishing to enroll in the above programs. USDA’s ability to implement conservation programs is highly dependent on this on-the-ground technical assistance, or Conservation Technical Assistance (CTA). CTA provides landowners with unique, location-specific solutions so that farmers and ranchers can implement conservation practices on their land, while taking responsibility for ensuring maximum return on public investment. . It is essential that NRCS offices are well staffed to better serve the producers and foresters of our country so that we can better mitigate and adapt to climate change.

Less than adequate funding for technical assistance and personnel would severely limit the ability of farmers and ranchers to improve soil health, protect water quality, create and maintain habitat for fish and threatened, endangered or economically important wildlife, and to prepare for and manage drought and flooding. .

Once again, we urge you to fully fund the Farm Bill conservation programs and increase funding for conservation operations to $1 billion so that our farmers, ranchers and foresters can be part of the climate solution.

Sincerely,

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Sidekick Health raises $55 million for digital first aid programs – TechCrunch https://h-fan.net/sidekick-health-raises-55-million-for-digital-first-aid-programs-techcrunch/ Thu, 05 May 2022 06:01:51 +0000 https://h-fan.net/sidekick-health-raises-55-million-for-digital-first-aid-programs-techcrunch/ Digital therapy plus pills? Icelandic Sidekick Health has developed a playful digital healthcare platform designed to support healthcare outcomes by applying personalized behavioral nudges, including alongside clinical treatments like drugs, to augment, expand and sustain patient care for a range of chronic diseases and conditions from cancer to cardiovascular disease. health, diabetes and arthritis – […]]]>

Digital therapy plus pills? Icelandic Sidekick Health has developed a playful digital healthcare platform designed to support healthcare outcomes by applying personalized behavioral nudges, including alongside clinical treatments like drugs, to augment, expand and sustain patient care for a range of chronic diseases and conditions from cancer to cardiovascular disease. health, diabetes and arthritis – a formula that has now earned it $55 million in Series B growth funding.

The new round is being led by London-based venture capital firm Novator Ventures, with participation from Wellington Partners, Asabys Partners and Frumtak Ventures, as well as a US-based strategic investor it doesn’t have. yet disclosed but will be revealed later. . The 2014-founded startup raised a Series A round of $20 million in 2020 from many of the same investors.

Upon the close of Series B, General Partner and Founder of Novator Ventures, Birgir Mar Ragnarsson, joins Sidekick’s Board of Directors.

Commenting in a statement, he said: “It has been impressive to watch the company’s rapid growth since closing its A-round 18 months ago. The company may have started in the Nordics, but I’m proud to say that Sidekick is now a globally recognized digital therapeutic player. Novator Ventures recognizes the immense opportunities presented by third generation therapies and Sidekick’s ability to scale and operate globally. We look forward to working closely with the Sidekick team to transform the way healthcare is delivered. »

Sidekick Health still doesn’t detail overall customer numbers (it’s a b2b digital health company, so it targets health insurance companies and pharmaceutical companies), but says it has partnered with some of the biggest names in healthcare, such as America’s Anthem to offer “digital-first” skincare programs and global pharmaceutical giants Bayer and Pfizer, to develop what it describes as “an integrated combination therapy composed of a molecular drug and a digital therapeutic”.

The startup tells us that its platform has helped more than 40,000 patients worldwide so far, with its products currently available in six languages. Its main markets are Europe and the United States, while it has offices in the United States, Germany, Sweden and in its home market, Iceland. With the funding for growth, he says he’s predicted a big US push.

“Europe and the United States are our biggest markets right now, but we are forging partnerships in Asia, he told TechCrunch. “But this is just the beginning, and we will focus on growing our US business footprint going forward.

“Sidekick will use the funding to support and expand our existing presence in the United States. Our North American strength and focus is exemplified by the recent additions of Pamela Stahl (CCO and President, North America) and Mitchell Mudra (COO) to the team. By 2026, an estimated one billion people will be served by some form of DTx [digital therapeutics] annually. Coupled with the fact that the United States spends a very high proportion of GDP on healthcare, the United States is a market where our products and services will achieve the best patient outcomes.

The startup tells TechCrunch it tripled its revenue in 2021, attributing the growth to a mix of existing and new business relationships. “This year, Sidekick plans to double our team from 120 to 240 members across our four offices,” he adds.

Pharmaceutical giants are interested in digital therapies not only as a scalable tool to (potentially) increase the effectiveness of their drugs with app-based support (e.g. putting digital tools in the hands of patients who can helping them remember to take pills and helping them in other ways, like making beneficial lifestyle changes around diet and exercise, or getting on-demand help for mental health issues or pain management, etc.), but as a way to extend the value of drugs – allowing pharma giants to file new patents linking existing drugs to digital therapeutic programs that are much cheaper and more easier to develop and iterate than expensive drug discovery and research activities.

“We are building a portfolio of over 40 medical-grade digital therapies by 2026,” Sidekick says, discussing its product roadmap. “Currently, 18 are in research and development, with a total of 14 commercial partnerships concluded to date, either with payers or with pharmaceutical partners, or, in some cases, both.”

“Sidekick has already commercialized digital therapeutics, in therapeutic areas ranging from rheumatoid arthritis, ulcerative colitis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and breast cancer,” he adds. “We will prioritize a substantial amount of our resources to expand our oncology portfolio, as well as invest in increased personalization, which will allow us to better serve people with multiple chronic conditions. »

With Series B funding in the bank, Sidekick also has more partnerships in the works – with three new collaborations to be announced in the coming months, including one focused on supporting breast cancer patients by helping patients manage side effects.

The startup has published a number of studies aimed at proving the effectiveness of its digital therapies – including examining the use of its platform to reduce stress and fatigue in patients with inflammatory bowel disease; or this small feasibility study on improving the management of patients with ulcerative colitis; and this small randomized controlled trial examining the use of his digital lifestyle program for the outpatient treatment of type 2 diabetes, to name a few – and he says it takes “the generation of evidence of scientific quality very seriously to ensure that we offer clinical companies a clinical-quality product for their patients”.

“The top 10 and 20 pharmaceutical companies and top 3 payers partner with us on their ‘future of the franchise’ assets, in areas such as oncology, metabolism, cardiovascular, immunology and immunotoxicology,” he adds, suggesting that its “rigidity of quality life science evidence and precision medicine approach is driving this.”

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Training Opportunities | VA Health Care Charleston https://h-fan.net/training-opportunities-va-health-care-charleston/ Tue, 03 May 2022 05:53:44 +0000 https://h-fan.net/training-opportunities-va-health-care-charleston/ Psychology Fellowship Program The MIRECC Psychology Fellowship Program at Charleston VAMC supports the professional development of research-oriented psychologists to become clinical investigators in innovative approaches to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and its comorbidities. During the two-year program, fellows receive intensive mentoring and instruction in clinical research skills such as grant writing, research design, and ethics, […]]]>

Psychology Fellowship Program

The MIRECC Psychology Fellowship Program at Charleston VAMC supports the professional development of research-oriented psychologists to become clinical investigators in innovative approaches to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and its comorbidities.

During the two-year program, fellows receive intensive mentoring and instruction in clinical research skills such as grant writing, research design, and ethics, while receiving supervised clinical training on treatments and advanced programs. The Charleston VAMC Advanced Fellowship Program is affiliated with the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC).

Fellows’ 40-hour work week includes approximately 10-15 hours/week of supervised direct service delivery, 25-30 hours/week of clinical research activities, and 4 hours/week of didactics (including 2 hours of face-to-face face-to-face). face-to-face, individual supervision by a licensed psychologist for clinical and research activities). Additionally, up to 5 hours/week of administrative experiences may be offered to support the scholar’s professional growth and individual goals. In collaboration with research mentors, fellows are expected to develop and implement a research pilot project, publish and present results, and use the latest technologies for educational activities and clinical service delivery. Application for independent federal grant funding by fellows is strongly encouraged (e.g., VA Career Development Award).

Our current scholarship recipients:

Danielle Taylordoctorate

Psychiatry

Dr. Taylor’s research focuses on assessing the mechanisms and consequences of anxiety, trauma and related disorders using psychophysiological techniques (EEG, heart rate, skin conductance, etc.). She recently extended this line of work to incorporate neuromodulation and was awarded a pilot grant to evaluate an emerging brain stimulation technique, transcutaneous atrial vagus nerve stimulation (taVNS), using multimodal psychophysiology.

Alyssa Jones, PhD

Psychiatry

Dr. Jones’ research program focuses on the role of affective vulnerabilities (eg, difficulties in emotion regulation) and specific emotions (eg, shame, guilt, disgust) in the development and maintenance of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) to inform therapeutic innovation. She is currently working on a project investigating disgust as a predictor of treatment outcome in veterans seeking treatment for PTSD. During her postdoctoral studies, she plans to seek grants to test novel interventions for trauma-related shame and loathing in veterans with PTSD.

Andrea Massa, PhD

Clinical Psychology

Dr. Massa is currently working on two projects, examining the roles of PTSD and alcohol abuse in predicting aggressive behavior and the role of emotion dysregulation in intimate partner aggression related to trauma and mental illness. alcohol.

Program directors:

Dan Gros, Ph.D. (Daniel.Gros@va.gov)

Elizabeth Santa Ana, Ph.D. (Elizabeth.SantaAna2@va.gov)

Registration deadline:

October 1 annually

Brochure: MIRECC Fellowship in Innovative Approaches to PTSD and its Comorbidities – Charleston (DOCX)

National website: MIRECC/CoE VA Advanced Fellowship in Mental Illness Research and Treatment – ​​MIRECC/CoE

HEROIC big rounds

The HEROIC Grand Rounds and Works in Progress is a forum for all researchers interested in HRH&D research. The framework is used to present ongoing research or work in progress to disseminate data and research results or to receive useful feedback from the HEROIC COIN scientific community for a project idea or an ongoing project.​​

The HEROIC Grand Rounds and Works in Progress forum meets on the 3rd Thursday of each month from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m., online (in virtual format) and in person. Meetings are open to COIN faculty members, faculty members not affiliated with MUSC or other institutions, and VA/MUSC trainees, including postdoctoral fellows and trainees to present their research.​

If you are interested in presenting at our HEROIC and Works in Progress Grand Rounds or would like to receive invitations and current speaker schedules, please contact Dr. Elizabeth Santa Ana (Associate Director of COIN) at: elizabeth.santaana2@va. gov or Ms. Kayla Lamb (COIN Administrator) at: Kayla.lamb@va.gov.

Veterans Research Mobilization Commission (VREB)

The Veterans Research Engagement Board is made up of a team of veterans of various races, genders, and backgrounds who have an interest in research at the Charleston VA Medical Center. The VREB is responsible for meeting with HEROIC researchers to discuss their research questions, provide research feedback, suggest research options and ideas, and report concerns about various aspects of research projects. Information and feedback from VREB members is summarized in abstract form and often used directly in research proposals for consideration for research funding. VREB members meet voluntarily online (for example, using the TEAMS virtual platform) once every two months for up to 120 minutes per meeting and non-veteran VREB members receive a small stipend per meeting. HEROIC COIN is interested in recruiting veteran volunteers to serve in the VREB. An interest in serving in the VREB and an interest in research and its impact on Veterans’ health care is all that is required.

If you are a veteran and are interested in research at the Charleston VAMC and its impact on veteran health care and would like to inquire about serving in the VREB, please contact Katherine.Beavis@va. gov or Elizabeth.santaana2@va.gov.

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Cat trap, neuter and vax programs help animals, public health https://h-fan.net/cat-trap-neuter-and-vax-programs-help-animals-public-health/ Sun, 01 May 2022 10:03:16 +0000 https://h-fan.net/cat-trap-neuter-and-vax-programs-help-animals-public-health/ As Executive Director of the Humane Society of Vero Beach & Indian River County, I was disappointed with the County Commissioners’ recent decision to retain a “leash law” for cats. Much of the debate centered on enforcement difficulties, on the one hand, and concerns about nuisance complaints, on the other. Meanwhile, too little attention has […]]]>
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Simulation Center Hosts Fifth Annual Simulation Symposium https://h-fan.net/simulation-center-hosts-fifth-annual-simulation-symposium/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 20:49:45 +0000 https://h-fan.net/simulation-center-hosts-fifth-annual-simulation-symposium/ The NYC Health + Hospitals Simulation Center Hosted the Fifth Annual Simulation Symposium Event focused on health equity and maternal health; watch the event here Keynote speakers included Jennifer Arnold, MD, MSc, FAAP, medical director of the Boston Children’s Hospital Simulator Program and star of TLC’s “The Little Couple.” New York, NY NYC […]]]>

The NYC Health + Hospitals Simulation Center Hosted the Fifth Annual Simulation Symposium

Event focused on health equity and maternal health; watch the event here

Keynote speakers included Jennifer Arnold, MD, MSc, FAAP, medical director of the Boston Children’s Hospital Simulator Program and star of TLC’s “The Little Couple.”

New York, NY

NYC Health + Hospitals today announced that its Simulation Center hosted the fifth annual Simulation Symposium on Wednesday, April 27. This year’s event used simulation-based education and advanced learning to help improve patient outcomes in the area of ​​health equity, particularly among underserved patients. and underrepresented communities. Many of the sessions focused on diversity, equity and inclusion. Additionally, the Simulation Center’s Maternal Mortality Reduction Program has demonstrated how simulation can affect disparate health outcomes by recreating high-risk medical emergencies for pregnant women of color. Komal Bajaj, MD, MS-HPEd and Chief Quality Officer of Jacobi/NCB and Ariel deRoche, MS of the Quality Office of Jacobi Medical Center spoke about their study on diagnostic safety in postpartum hemorrhage. The event can be viewed here.

Keynote speakers included Jennifer Arnold, MD, MSc, FAAP, Medical Director of Boston Children’s Hospital Simulation Program and star of TLC’s “The Little Couple”; Michelle Morse, MD, MPH, chief medical officer and deputy commissioner of the Center for Health Equity and Community Wellbeing at the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene; Kelly Davis, MPH, executive director of New Voices of Reproductive Justice; and Desiree Díaz, PhD, APRN, FNP-BC, CNE, CHSE-A, ANEF, FAAN, co-founder and CEO of Kinshift.

“To keep every New Yorker safe and healthy, we must continue to invest in technology to train and upskill our healthcare providers, said Eric Adams, Mayor of New York. “NYC Health + Hospitals world-class simulation-based training will improve patient safety, quality of care, and keep us at the forefront of medicine and healthcare. »

“The simulation offers the opportunity to build bridges with allies to better understand how to participate in the health equity conversation, create space to reflect and learn from our mistakes,” said NYC Health + Hospitals/Simulation Center Senior Associate Vice President Michael Meguerdichian, MD, MPH-Ed. “It’s also an opportunity to design processes and spaces that better adapt to the needs of the communities we serve. Engaging these communities is really our next big step in having an impact on how we change our culture.

The NYC Health + Hospitals Simulation Center has been using experiential learning for 12 years and recently created courses that address health disparity and equity. Its Maternal Mortality Program emphasizes the impact of implicit biases on women of color and attempts to reshape the approaches providers take when faced with high-risk obstetrical situations.

“Simulation is one of the most important ways to prepare our birth care teams (doctors, midwives, nurses) to prepare for low probability, high acuity events. Sometimes we call these events “never”. Our simulation teams have been excellent in preparing our obstetrical providers to manage obstetric hemorrhages, cardiac events in pregnancy, and severe and life-threatening hypertension in pregnancy,” said NYC Health + Hospitals Women’s Health Lead Wendy Wilcox, MD, MPH, MBA, FACOG. “Our simulation leadership has been visionary in including the concepts of equity, diversity and inclusion in simulation training, and this year’s conference has done a great job of highlighting these issues to address the racial disparities. Congratulations to Dr. Meguerdichian and the whole team of the Maternal Mortality Reduction Program for an enlightening and stimulating conference!”

The NYC Health + Hospitals Simulation Center program includes a state-of-the-art 10,000 square foot training center in the Bronx. The center includes fully functional clinical environments, such as intensive care, operating rooms or emergency rooms, to recreate trauma and life-threatening complications. Simulations help healthcare professionals practice procedures and engage in teamwork scenarios to hone the clinical, communication and collaboration skills they need to reduce medical errors and make them safer patients a priority. The Center has satellite simulation centers in a number of public system hospitals and its Correctional Health Services operations.

The simulation program uses the most advanced technology, including a family of high-fidelity mannequins with a range of skin tones, which adds startling realism to the learner’s experience and underlines the priority of the healthcare system in to address and dismantle the biases implicit in patient care. The health system simulation program is modeled after similar programs at Harvard University, Mayo Clinic, and the North Shore Long Island Jewish Health System.

In 2020, NYC Health + Hospitals Simulation Center became the first program in the world to receive accreditation from the International Society for Simulation in Healthcare (ISSH) in all five assessed areas, including its simulation scholarship. These areas include evaluation, research, teaching/education, systems integration and the fellowship program.


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